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London

Euston Station

1962

 

BloodandCustard Euston Station 1962
Main Entrance
Main entrance to 'Old Euston' from the restricted courtyard off Drummond Street. 
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Main Entrance

Main entrance to 'Old Euston' from the restricted courtyard off Drummond Street.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

Taken on 6th April 1962 (unless dated otherwise), a significant number of excellent photographs by Ben Brooksbank and Alan Murray-Rust have come to Blood and Custard’s attention in respect of the old Euston Station not long before its demolition and rebuilding. A further selection of photographs (1963 to 1965) includes the rebuilding of the station.

 

BloodandCustard 
Euston Station
Doric Arch at Euston Station
12th February 1962
Demolition of the Doric Arch begins, this being 'in the way' of the approaches to the New Euston. Despite of vigorous protests by many eminent people it was condemned in October 1961 by Ernest Marples, then Minister of Transport supported by the Conservative Prime Minister (Harold Macmillan). The breakers moved in on 6th November 1961.
“I took this photograph on a wet 12 February 1962. When the new - and dreadful - 'Great Hall' had been completed in 1968 it was found that there was plenty of room after all”. 
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Doric Arch at Euston Station
12th February 1962

Demolition of the Doric Arch begins; this being 'in the way' of the approaches to the New Euston. Despite of vigorous protests by many eminent people it was condemned in October 1961 by Ernest Marples, then Minister of Transport supported by the Conservative Prime Minister (Harold Macmillan). The breakers moved in on 6th November 1961.

“I took this photograph on a wet 12 February 1962. When the new - and dreadful - 'Great Hall' had been completed in 1968 it was found that there was plenty of room after all”.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard Euston Station 1962
Euston Station
From Euston Road the entrance to Euston Station after removal of the Doric Arch. The two flanking 'classical' lodges remain, the LNWR War Memorial is prominent. The Station is beyond the Euston Hotel, which also disappeared in the 1960s rebuilding. 
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Euston Station

From Euston Road the entrance to Euston Station after removal of the Doric Arch. The two flanking 'classical' lodges remain, the LNWR War Memorial is prominent. The Station is beyond the Euston Hotel, which also disappeared in the sixties rebuilding.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard Euston Station 1962
Arrival Side
Arrival side from the road approach off Drummond Street. Platforms 1 and 2 are off to the right, Platforms 3 and 4 and the rest of the station are to the left. Note the poster advertising the 'Starlight Specials' to Scotland.
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Arrival Side

Arrival side from the road approach off Drummond Street. Platforms 1 and 2 are off to the right, Platforms 3 and 4 and the rest of the station are to the left. Note the poster advertising the 'Starlight Specials' to Scotland.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard Euston Station 1962
Arrival Side
Arrival side to Drummond Street, south-east from roadway between Platforms 1/2 (left) and 3/4 (right).
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Arrival Side

Arrival side to Drummond Street, south-east from roadway between Platforms 1/2 (left) and 3/4 (right).

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard
Euston Station
Great Hall
10th April 1960
Interior of Great Hall at Euston Station, built by the (then) newly created London & North Western Railway in 1846 at the 1837 terminus of the London & Birmingham Railway. Ahead is the grand staircase leading to the gallery and shareholders' room, past the 1852 statue of George Stephenson. 
Removed in 1961 and weighing around six tones, the marble statue of George Stephenson on its plinth was 15' high. It was commissioned from sculptor Edward Hodges Baily (1788-1867). Picked out in gold, its inscription reads: 
“George Stephenson; Born June 9th 1781; Died August 12th 1848”
“Being a Sunday there are relatively few people around - except the inevitable sleeping drunk. A splendid place for a booking-office, but you normally bought your ticket from a little guichet outside in a narrow passageway. This was all destroyed in 1962.”
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Great Hall
10th April 1960

Interior of Great Hall at Euston Station, built by the (then) newly created London & North Western Railway in 1846 at the 1837 terminus of the London & Birmingham Railway. Ahead is the grand staircase leading to the gallery and shareholders' room, past the 1852 statue of George Stephenson.

Removed in 1961 and weighing around six tones, the marble statue of George Stephenson on its plinth was 15' high. It was commissioned from sculptor Edward Hodges Baily (1788-1867). Picked out in gold, its inscription reads:

“George Stephenson; Born June 9th 1781; Died August 12th 1848”

“Being a Sunday there are relatively few people around - except the inevitable sleeping drunk. A splendid place for a booking-office, but you normally bought your ticket from a little guichet outside in a narrow passageway. This was all destroyed in 1962.”

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard Euston Station 1962
Circulating Corridor
Circulating corridor behind main entrance, looking towards Arrival side. The Great Hall was to the left. A limited number of 'retail outlets' lined the corridor.
“A totally different Age. Note how smart everybody is!”
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Circulating Corridor

Circulating corridor behind main entrance, looking towards Arrival side. The Great Hall was to the left. A limited number of 'retail outlets' lined the corridor.

“A totally different Age. Note how smart everybody is!”

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard Euston Station 1962
Platform 3
Outward view to the barriers of Local Platforms 4/5 and 6/7 (on left); in the centre is Main Arrival Platform 3, then the roadway for picking up passengers and luggage and over to the right are Main Arrival Platform 2/1. Head Wrightson Ltd of Thornaby-on-Tees built railway wagons (including some of British Rail’s Salmon engineering vehicles).
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Platform 3

Outward view to the barriers of Local Platforms 4/5 and 6/7 (on left); in the centre is Main Arrival Platform 3, then the roadway for picking up passengers and luggage and over to the right are Main Arrival Platform 2/1. Head Wrightson Ltd of Thornaby-on-Tees built railway wagons (including some of British Rail’s Salmon engineering vehicles).

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard Euston Station 1962
Platform 3
Looking inward from Platform 3 on the Arrival side to the shorter platforms 4/5 and 6/7, which were used for local trains being DC electrified for the service to Watford. 
On the left the taxi-ramp can be seen descending between Nos. 2 and 3, having curved all the way round outside No. 1 from Drummond Street.
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Platform 3

Looking inward from Platform 3 on the Arrival side to the shorter platforms 4/5 and 6/7, which were used for local trains being DC electrified for the service to Watford.

On the left the taxi-ramp can be seen descending between nos. 2 and 3, having curved all the way round outside No. 1 from Drummond Street.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard Euston Station 1962
Platform 10/11
With a Ford Thames 400E van, outward in middle section to Platforms 11 (left) and 10 (further on right), in roadway used by parcels and other vans.
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Platform 10/11

With a Ford Thames 400E van, outward in middle section to Platforms 11 (left) and 10 (further on right), in roadway used by parcels and other vans.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard Euston Station 1962
Platform 12/13
To the barriers on Platform 12/13. On the right is Fowler no. 42367 at Platform 14 on empty stock it has brought in from Willesden. 
Immediately above is a bridge for vans leading from Cardington Street to Platforms 11 and 10 where parcels etc. were loaded.
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Platform 12/13

To the barriers on Platform 12/13. On the right is Fowler no. 42367 at Platform 14 on empty stock it has brought in from Willesden.

Immediately above is a bridge for vans leading from Cardington Street to Platforms 11 and 10 where parcels etc. were loaded.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard Euston Station 1962
Platform 12/13
Departure side: outward on Platforms 13/12.
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Platform 12/13

Departure side: outward on Platforms 13/12.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard Euston Station 1962
Platform 12/13
Departure side: inward view to barriers along Platform 12/13.
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Platform 12/13

Departure side: inward view to barriers along Platform 12/13.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard Euston Station 1962
Platform 13/14
Departure side: outward at the end of Platform 13, Stanier 'Coronation' 8P no. 46228 'Duchess of Rutland' is about to leave on the 10.25 to Carlisle and Windermere. 
Ahead is the Ampthill Square Bridge No. 2. Until 1952 there would also have been the Bridge No. 1, making the whole top end of the Station very restricted and claustrophobic, dominated by the great No. 2 Signalbox; No. 2 Bridge was also removed when the New Euston was built.
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Platform 13/14

Departure side: outward at the end of Platform 13, Stanier 'Coronation' 8P no. 46228 'Duchess of Rutland' is about to leave on the 10.25 to Carlisle and Windermere.

Ahead is the Ampthill Square Bridge No. 2. Until 1952 there would also have been the Bridge No. 1, making the whole top end of the Station very restricted and claustrophobic, dominated by the great No. 2 Signalbox; No. 2 Bridge was also removed when the New Euston was built.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard Euston Station 1962
Platform 14/15
Departure side: outward view with the empty stock of a Down express near the buffer-stops of platform 14 brought in from Willesden by LMS Fowler 4P no. 42367.
This was the great old, rambling station not long before it was rebuilt in 1966. The main Departure side (Platforms 12-15) were separated by various structures (including the Great Hall) and local platforms from the Arrival side well away on the east side.
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Platform 14/15

Departure side: outward view with the empty stock of a Down express near the buffer-stops of platform 14 brought in from Willesden by LMS Fowler 4P no. 42367.

This was the great old, rambling station not long before it was rebuilt for 1966. The main Departure side (Platforms 12-15) were separated by various structures (including the Great Hall) and local platforms from the Arrival side well away on the east side.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard
Euston Station
April 1960
Sunshine streaming through the glazed curtain wall alleviates the generally dingy atmosphere of the old Euston Station. Royal Scot class no.46153 'The Royal Dragoon' makes its departure.
© Alan Murray-Rust (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Euston Station
April 1960

Sunshine streaming through the glazed curtain wall alleviates the generally dingy atmosphere of the old Euston Station. Royal Scot class no.46153 'The Royal Dragoon' makes its departure.

© Alan Murray-Rust (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard 
Euston Station
April 1960
The station throat with a Black 5 locomotive propelling empty stock under the Ampthill Square Bridge (which has since been demolished). In the foreground are the DC electrified tracks for the local services to Watford which used the fourth-rail system (shared with Bakerloo Line underground trains north from Queens Park).
© Alan Murray-Rust (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Euston Station
April 1960

The station throat with a Black 5 locomotive propelling empty stock under the Ampthill Square Bridge (which has since been demolished). In the foreground are the DC electrified tracks for the local services to Watford which used the fourth-rail system (shared with Bakerloo Line underground trains north from Queens Park).

© Alan Murray-Rust (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard 
Euston Station
April 1960
'Jinty' tank locomotive no.47522 is performing station pilot duties (shunting a parcels van) while Black 5 no.44752 is awaiting departure.
© Alan Murray-Rust (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Euston Station
April 1960

'Jinty' tank locomotive no.47522 is performing station pilot duties (shunting a parcels van) while Black 5 no.44752 is awaiting departure.

© Alan Murray-Rust (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard Euston Station 1962
Eversholt Street
South-east on Eversholt Street at Drummond Street (by Euston Station) towards Euston Road and along Upper Woburn Place to St Pancras Church in the mist. 
This was before the rebuilding of Euston Station in 1966, in which this end of Drummond Street was swallowed up..
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Eversholt Street

South-east on Eversholt Street at Drummond Street (by Euston Station) towards Euston Road and along Upper Woburn Place to St Pancras Church in the mist.

This was before the rebuilding of Euston Station for 1966, in which this end of Drummond Street was swallowed up.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

Reconstruction of Euston Station
1963

 

BloodandCustard
Euston Station
Arrival side 
28th August 1963
A transitional view outward on the remains of the roadway between the former Platforms 2 and 3, showing the entrances to the Underground station.
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Arrival side
28th August 1963

A transitional view outward on the remains of the roadway between the former Platforms 2 and 3, showing the entrances to the Underground station.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard
Euston Station
Platform 6 
28th August 1963
From the former of Platform 6, considerable rebuilding has occurred on the site of the Main Arrival platforms.
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Platform 6
28th August 1963

From the former of Platform 6, considerable rebuilding has occurred on the site of the Main Arrival platforms.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard
Euston Station
Platform 8 
28th August 1963
With more of the New Euston on the left, two Type 1 Diesels now in use on empty stock workings. Ahead, Ampthill Square No. 2 Bridge is still there. 
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Platform 8
28th August 1963

With more of the New Euston on the left, two Type 1 Diesels now in use on empty stock workings. Ahead, Ampthill Square No. 2 Bridge is still there.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

BloodandCustard
Euston Station
Platform 8 
28th August 1963
From the remains of Platform 8, rebuilt and electrified with an EMU waiting to leave for Watford Junction. The inner part of the Main Arrival side is a wasteland, seemingly not able to receive trains. Beyond is Euston House on Eversholt Street.
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Platform 8
28th August 1963

From the remains of Platform 8, rebuilt and electrified with an EMU waiting to leave for Watford Junction. The inner part of the Main Arrival side is a wasteland, seemingly not able to receive trains. Beyond is Euston House on Eversholt Street.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

1964

 

BloodandCustard
Euston Station
Platform 3 
15th May 1964
Outward from barrier end of Arrival side, on site of former Platforms 3 on the right and 8 on the left.
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Platform 3
15th May 1964

Outward from barrier end of Arrival side, on site of former Platforms 3 on the right and 8 on the left.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

1965

 

BloodandCustard
Euston Station
Arrival platforms 
17th July 1965
Looking inwards from the end of the Arrival platforms. Main-line electric trains started to run in November 1965 and here the wires are already up, but a steam locomotive (Stanier 5MT no. 45292) is still to be seen. The New Station is now recognisable.
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

Arrival platforms
17th July 1965

Looking inwards from the end of the Arrival platforms. Main-line electric trains started to run in November 1965 and here the wires are already up, but a steam locomotive (Stanier 5MT no. 45292) is still to be seen. The New Station is now recognisable.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

 

Ben Brooksbank

In researching photographs for BloodandCustard webpages many excellent the photographs taken by Ben Brooksbank emerged of the geographically-based Geograph website.

Ben granted permission to use these photographs under the Creative Commons licence. Sadly, those of us here at BloodandCustard never got to meet Ben (a lifelong railway enthusiast and Retired Medical Scientist sadly he passed on 24th February 2018). However, this page is dedicated in gratitude towards both Ben and his foresight to take these photographs which form part of an important historical record.

 

 

 

 

COPYRIGHT BLOODANDCUSTARD

PHOTOGRAPHIC COPYRIGHT BEN BROOKSBANK (CC-BY-SA/2.0)
& ALAN MURRAY-RUST (CC-BY-SA/2.0) -
WITH GRATITUDE FOR USE

 

 

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