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© BloodandCustard

Southern Signalling
Shoreham-by-Sea B ‘CCE’
From the memoires of Clive Robey

 

A group of people standing in front of a building

Description automatically generated

Shoreham-by-Sea ‘B’

© Clive Robey

 

Signalman Grade ‘B’ Duties

A vacancy came up in 1974 while at Pulborough and as I was still living at home in Hove, this was perfect. A round the clock job, so no worries about getting to and fro. A doubling of the train service compared to Pulborough was welcomed but even this had its mundane moments.

The other two residents were Ken Harris and Alan Langridge. The RDR were Mick Wadsworth, Eric Tyler and Jim Stapleton (brother of Paddy, Brighton driver). The GPR were George Uwins, George Spicer, Charlie Osman, Brian Whipp, Len Jennings and Len Lower to name but a few.

The location of the box was at the west end of the up platform, facing south.

 

Signalman Robey in 1974. Note the marble top on the gas heater (see text).

© Clive Robey [1974]

 

 

Rostered Hours

The rostered hours were:

Monday to Saturday - 06.00-14.00.
Sunday off, late turn Monday to Saturday, 14.00-22.00
Sunday - 06.00-14.00 & 22.00-06.00,

then nights through to Saturday night inclusive,
then Sunday 14.00-22.00, before starting on early turn again.

The mutual changeovers, not recognised by management were roughly on early turn 07.00, late turn 13.00 and nights 21.00. The doubling back weekends were all pre-Hidden and were a struggle, especially coming back inside 6 hours which had to allow for travelling to home and back, plus a couple of hours kip, although we didn’t know any different until Clapham.

With the rest days, especially on nights, it was utterly ridiculous to have a rest day in the middle of a week of nights but Hidden soon sorted that out with new rosters. Even though nights here weren’t particularly onerous, the change from Saturday night to late turn Sunday then early Monday was hard. It was Tuesday before one could feel human again.

Late turn Saturday to early turn Sunday then back for Sunday wasn’t too bad. Perversely you could be rest day off Saturday night, then work late turn Sunday, then rest day off for early turn Monday.

The rostering arrangements at boxes from Goring westwards and on the Arun Valley was quite different, early, nights then late over a three week period. Just the one double back instead of two.

 

Signalbox diagram 23rd December 1987

© Clive Robey

 

 

Signalling Arrangements

Down trains were offered on from Shoreham-by-Sea ‘A’ upon receiving TES from Portslade after which it was offered straight onto Lancing. TES to the ‘B’ box was when the ‘A’ box signalman could see the train coming around Kingston Curve. This was to ensure the ‘A’ box could get the down (section signal) home back in the frame otherwise he couldn't open the gates or lift the barriers.

On occasions (and depending who was there_ they forgot or were late to give TES and if the ‘B’ box wasn’t keeping an eye on the clock, then the train would arrive in the platform with the gates across the track. A box instruction in the ‘B’ box stated that the gates had to be wound for a down train two minutes before the train was due to arrive, this was due to the immediate proximity of the B box down home at Buckingham Road level crossing.

 

Victoria – Littlehampton train passing the ‘A’ box. The slotted distant, No. 2, is ‘off’.

© Clive Robey [1979]

 

The ‘B’ box view of down trains was enhanced by being able to see over the top of the up platform station canopy so a train could be observed coming around Kingston curve. But even then, for a stopping train it was too late to give the distant.

The up inner home, the down distant and the down starter all had wire adjusters. The inner home wire snapped on me once, propelling me towards the marble top of the gas heater. Ouch.

So, if a train arrived in the platform with one waiting on the starter, then the gates would have been wound round, then when the train had come to a complete stand, the gates could then be opened again for road traffic. This changed after the barriers were installed and the down home moved 25m back. West Worthing terminators were offered onto Lancing as normal but with a 1-2 TES.

Down home signals

No. 5 (upper) Down Main Home, platform starting.

No. 7 (lower). To Goods Home, platform starting.

Signal no. 5 was converted 3 aspect colour light on 21st September 1985 (eventually becoming LG11 upon control from Lancing panel 1 in 1988).

© Clive Robey [1978]

 

A similar arrangement occurred on the up. An up train was offered on to the ‘A’ box upon receiving TES from Lancing which had been offered on when leaving Worthing. TES to the ‘A’ box was given when the train was approaching Shoreham viaduct, occupying ‘F’ track circuit. This enabled the ‘A’ box to wind the gates round for when the train arrived in the platform and the ‘B’ box to get the inner (section signal) back in the frame. Operation of the down distant was slotted with the ‘A’ box down home.

One signalman was on the lazy side and would sometimes complain if I'd pulled off first. The ‘A’ box motorised up distant, was slotted underneath the B box inner home. TOS to Lancing was given upon arrival of an up train in the platform. TOS to the ‘A’ box for a down train was after passing the clearing point, the facing crossover for the Beeding branch.

 

A 4 VEP /2 HAP Portsmouth Harbour – Brighton approaching

the facing crossover used by the Beeding freight.

© Clive Robey [1978]

 

 

Train Service Arrangements

The basic off-peak service was four an hour each way. Headcodes being as follows:

60

Brighton – Portsmouth Harbour ‘semi’ fast

62

Brighton – Portsmouth Harbour stopper via Littlehampton
(although in 1977, the headcode was 32)

64

Brighton – Bognor Regis not via Littlehampton.

16

Victoria – Littlehampton

There was a 50 minute gap between the down London and the Pompey stopper if you wanted Littlehampton. Going via Ford didn’t help as the Portsmouth to Brighton via Littlehampton left two minutes before the Brighton – Bognor arrived there. Most of these headcodes changed over the years.

 

18.12 Brighton to Portsmouth (headcode 62).

© Clive Robey [1979]

 

In the 1970's and into the 80’s, the only additional traffic was thus:

1D01 04.50 Brighton – Worthing paper train, passing through at 04.59, departing ECS to Chichester at 05.30. This was in 1977, although in other years, it would return to ECS to Brighton.

Also, (in 1977) there was the 4F13 13.30 Bricklayers Arms to Chichester van train, calling at Worthing from 17.09 until 17.57, after shunting to the up loop.

MWFo – 6D39 09.07 Brighton to West Worthing coal train.

TUTHo – 6D37 09.07 Brighton to Beeding gypsum.

1V10 09.00 Brighton to Exeter St David’s, Cardiff or Plymouth or Bristol or Paignton loco hauled MK 1 stock or Hastings units. For the loco hauled Saturday service, the stock would come from Yeovil Junction as ECS on a Friday evening.

MO – 6F11 05.54 Lovers Walk to Fratton, stores unit.

6J11 13.50 Brighton – Portsmouth & Southsea, parcels.

Over the years, the line saw a regular procession of stock including 4 VEP, 4 CIG, 4 BIG, 4 CEP, 4 BEP, 4 HAP and 4 CAP stock.

-In addition to the hourly trains in the summer and two-hourly in the winter via the Mid Sussex for engineering work on the BML, the passenger service continued up until the 01.09 from Brighton to West Worthing. This service, as with the 00.05 Brighton to West Worthing were set down and pick up services. Neither of these services had return ECS workings back to Lovers Walk as they have done for many years, thus increasing possession time. These last two trains were eventually stopped due to vandalism and became ‘set down’ only, although this didn’t deter some optimistic passengers trying to get on.

The last up passenger was at 23.34 to Brighton. It was not unusual for somebody to call up from the platform after this train had passed asking what time was the next one. 05.36 was not the answer they were looking for.

 

Mystery excursion, Swansea – Worthing.

© Clive Robey [1978]

 

5D00, the 04.39 Worthing to Brighton Top Yard vans off 4Y11, 22.25 Bricklayers Arms to Worthing was guaranteed to disturb the night, booked through at 04.45, although this was invariably earlier.

In later years, there was a service where the London’s detached /attached at Hove instead of Worthing. The front portion was then non-stop to/from Worthing. So as with the 04.50 Brighton paper train, on receiving ILC from the ‘A’ box upon coming through Portslade, it was wind round and pull off straight away. On the up, as with anything not stopping at Lancing, there was no difference, but the ‘A’ box would wind round and pull off straight away. Complaints came from local residents as this arrangement effectively became an extra train, thereby increasing the down time of the barriers.

The section running time to Lancing was shown in the WTT as 4 minutes for stopping trains, in reality this was always achieved in 3 minutes.

 

Brighton – Portsmouth Harbour train departing. Note the angled handle on the window frame, essential for leverage when winding the gates.

© Clive Robey [1979]

 

Level Crossing

On average, there were eight trains an hour, so winding the gates was an excellent way of keeping the stomach in trim. Of course, you were always on the lookout for a ‘double’. The gates could be quite heavy, especially in windy conditions and when I was on an early turn Monday, I would beg the Shoreham-by-Sea based S&T to come and grease the gate mechanism. One of the old lags tried to tell me that the gates were heavy because the worm was too tall. Oddly enough, they spun round quite freely after greasing.

Ideally, the wooden boards at the base of each corner post would be removed to clear all the litter. Lack of greasing meant that that getting the gates over the stops in either position could be a problem.

Bert Thayre lived in Shoreham-by-Sea and was in charge of the AMI’s. One morning he came up the steps and wasn’t very impressed that one of the gates across the track hadn’t gone over the stops. There were other occasions when the gates refused to go all the way to the stops thus not being able to get the lever back in the frame. At most other boxes, it was just a case of nipping out and giving the offending gate a shove. At the ‘B’ box, the layout of the stairs and gate made this a bit difficult due to the time involved in getting to the offending gate. Of course, by this time, the train had been brought to a stand on the protecting signal. No doubt the train driver thought we were late in pulling off.

Some pedestrians stood in the middle of the road to be first across when the gates opened. On more than one occasion when a gate wouldn’t go all the way, I would lean out of the window and ask said pedestrian to pull the offending gate over to reach the stops. Whereas the ‘A’ box at the time was three tracks wide (the siding to Kingston Wharf which ran parallel to the down line) and could be pushed around with one finger.

Winding the gates at any box was always a lottery. Taxi’s and buses were particularly well known (and still are) for ignoring what is coming towards them, but more often not, it was a question of just keeping going because stopping two tons of rodding and wood was not an instant affair. Unlike today’s arrangements, the only immediate clue a pedestrian had was hearing the gate stops drop. One gate might move slightly before the winding started, but that was it. The only signs at the crossing were the red targets on each gate, plus the lamp atop the gates.

I never worked Littlehaven but the problem with jumping the gates and errant pedestrians became so bad that wig-wags and yodels were eventually installed. Even this wasn’t enough to deter some of the users.

 

Standard three position block instrument, to Shoreham-by-Sea ‘A’. Hook switch hanging at the back. Instruments along the block shelf from the left:

Dual cancelling button to the ‘A’ box for up trains;

Backlock release for the down home;

No.6, Down Main Starting;

Dual cancelling button to the ‘A’ box for down trains;

No. 8 point indicator;

Backlock release on 5 & 7;

Bell plunger to ‘A’ box; Earth alarm buzzer.

© Clive Robey [1978]

 

Track Circuits

Traction return could be a problem. If a down 12-car was pulling away, it would drop the track circuits on the up, with a large arc from the 6’ con rail, thus not being able to give ILC to Lancing until the track circuit had cleared. Until the brass plungers were replaced with the grey boxes and black buttons, the possibility of a small electric ‘shock’ between the lever and brass plunger was always there, while stood on the frame.

 

Signals off for a down train. The electrified gloves are hanging above the gate wheel.

© Clive Robey [1979]

 

Dual Cancelling Buttons

As with all boxes between Portslade and at least Drayton, dual cancelling buttons were provided. In the event of a wrong pull or a train not going forward after ILC had been given, the section signal would be replaced after the box in advance had gone to TOL. Eventually the train would then move forward but because the block had been cancelled off, it required the signalman who had cancelled the train off to press the dual cancelling simultaneously with the signalman at the next box pressing the commutator button and dual cancelling button to restore the block. This essentially stopped a free pull. I once saw that it was possible to slide a knife under the block instrument which could ‘give’ you a line clear. Highly irregular.

If TOS was awaited, trains would be checked on the down home and the up outer home would not be pulled until ‘F’ track circuit was occupied.

Road Traffic Incidents

The lighting at the crossing in the days of the gates was poor, basically two streetlights, controlled from within the box. The station approach on the downside was quite low, so vehicles emerging from there didn't have a good view of southbound traffic coming over the crossing. On one dark night, a Reliant Regal pulled out from the approach directly into the path of a car. The car pulled up in a heap and the driver got out. Instead of remonstrating with the Reliant driver, the driver bent down and tipped the Reliant on its side, after which he drove off.

Prior to the upgrade of the crossing from gates to barriers, there was an entrance to the station subway directly under the box. This allowed pedestrians to avoid waiting but the steps were quite steep. Following the upgrade and the eventual abolishment of the box, the entrance was filled in leaving just the subway linking the two platforms. This became very controversial years later as GTR put in ticket barriers meaning that pedestrians had to wait for trains to pass and the barriers to rise. The Shoreham Society has been campaigning various parties for the subway to be fully opened again. Those with disabilities would not benefit from this development.

The conversion of the crossing to barriers in September 1985 was a dangerous affair with only pennants being provided to close the crossing off. This resulted in many near misses with vehicles. Upgrades are handled quite differently now with a crossing closed to vehicles completely and fenced off. The street lighting mentioned earlier didn’t help. All of this was in the days of minimal hi-vis, long before we became clad from head to foot.

 

Up train passing Shoreham-by-Sea ‘A’ box having just passed No.28, Up Home Signal. Shoreham (actually known as Brighton B and was in Southwick) power station chimney’s in the background. Built in 1948 - demolished in 2009.

© Clive Robey [1978]

 

 

Closing Out

The ’A’ box had a closing switch, which I had never known to be used. It hadn’t been disconnected or wired up so you couldn’t use it. I wasn’t aware that any maintenance was ever carried out on it. Most boxes carried long term vacancies. If the boxes had a full establishment, there was also much work for the GPRs. January was always a lean time. In the mid 80’s, there were many vacancies and much overtime was being worked; all before Hidden Report into Clapham Junction.

This culminated when I was late turn at the ‘B’ box as a GPR one day and whoever was early turn at the ’A’ box phoned to say he didn’t have any relief. He wasn’t able to stay on, so about 14.00, he closed out, thus shutting the line. The London’s went via the Arun Vallley, nothing came past Worthing and I think a shuttle service was put on between Brighton and Portslade. I’m not sure who but somebody came up the bright idea of switching the ‘A’ box out. I’d passed out at the ‘A’ box some years previously and I was asked to go and switch the box out properly, as opposed to it having been ‘closed’ out earlier leaving the signals ‘on’ and the gates across the track.

I wasn’t able to close out properly because in order for the ‘A’ box down home to be pulled, I had to give a Line Clear before leaving the box. At this point, nobody actually knew whether the operation of the closing switch would work. The block sections would become the ‘B’ box Inner Home through to Portslade and the intermediate at Southwick through to clear of the ‘B’ box level crossing. Clearly the booked train service couldn’t run. 

So, I walked up the platform to the ‘A’ box and to everybody’s surprise, it worked. The ‘A’ box was unique along the coast (apart from Woodgate) at that time as having wicket gates, on the Southwick side of the crossing. It was heavily used throughout the day by judicious use of observing where the trains were and allowing pedestrians to cross even though a train had been signalled. With the box switched out, it was considered highly unsafe to leave the wicket gates unlocked allowing pedestrians to cross with nobody looking out for them. So the lever (No. 3) remained in the frame.

This also caused problems for HGVs coming off the A259 to go along Dolphin Road towards the industrial estate. Going over Buckingham Road level crossing, along Gordon Road was not suitable for HGVs due to the narrow road and parked vehicles.

Returned to the ‘B’ box and the trains started running. From my vantage point in the ‘B’ box, I could see pedestrians climbing over the gates, irrespective of an approaching train.

I can’t remember if this was a one-off occurrence but given the staffing levels, it probably wasn’t. I’m not sure if the night man came in at 18.00.

 

The barrier controls are on the wooden upright at the other end. The square at the end of the wooden board is the space where the wheel and worm were located.

© Clive Robey [23rd December 1987]

 

 

The Basic Facilities

Heating.

With no porch at the top of the stairs, an easterly wind could reduce the temperature inside the box. One night, I fixed a blanket to the inside door frame and behind was a thermometer which showed below freezing. Enamel saucepans with water were used to adorn the gas heaters at most boxes to put some vapour back into the air. As with Pulborough, the cooking facilities were the basic Baby Belling with an Ascot water heater.

Shops

With the ‘B’ box being more or less in the centre of Shoreham-by-Sea, this had advantages in that with suitable gaps in the train service you could nip to the shop opposite, a luxury not afforded if you were at the ‘A’ box where if you hadn’t got some milk with you when you took duty, tough. Fridges hadn’t been provided in boxes at this time. Standing your milk bottle in cold water was the only way of keeping it cool. In the winter, the boxes had to be kept warm, so the milk was kept outside somewhere. However, One relief signalman took the occasional gap in the service as the opportunity to nip into the Crab Tree and sink a pint in a matter of minutes. Flicking over may have been involved……….

Nightime

With the ability to control the crossing lights and the station lights on a timer, the opportunity was taken that adequate ‘rest’ was taken at night. However, if the last one from Brighton was very late after waiting for the midnight from Victoria, I would go across to the staff room and leave the platform lights on manual. The latest the last train arrived was about 03.00 due to snow.

Cleaning was normally done on early turn Saturday; I was still keen enough to scrub the board. The windows could be a problem which could be guaranteed to have a fine level of brake dust.

Public Houses

As with most boxes along the coast, there was at least one pub in the immediate vicinity, Shoreham-by-Sea B had three always guaranteeing some action in the late evenings. The Crab Tree was behind the box. Directly opposite was The Burrell and directly opposite that was The Buckingham Arms.

George Carver was my regular mate at Lancing and he rang me on the direct line one Saturday night to ask for police assistance as bricks were being thrown at the box from the delinquents from The Merry Monk.

PW Inspector Bill Smith in 1978.

Sadly, he died whilst on duty in the box while on possession duties.

© Clive Robey

 

 

Miscellany

George also had this quirk that come 17.00 on a weekday, we would stop using ‘Call Attention’ as ‘all the bosses had gone home’. Jim Brown was my regular mate at the ‘A’ box. The only time Jim didn’t use Call Attention was for the paper train at 05.00 in the morning. You stopped or delayed the paper train at your peril, long before the days of TRUST.

Another curio was the delivery of a box of blood off the down London arriving at 21.30 on a weekday evening. There was never any advice, it just turned up, put on the platform by the guard with no platform staff to look after it. A phone call would be made to Southlands Hospital, just up the road, and a taxi would appear and retrieve the blood.

On the other hand, Stan Richardson was Operations Manager when the area was managed from Chichester. He lived in Yorkshire and went home most weekends. On his return on a Sunday evening, prior to going to his caravan near Chichester and alighting from a train along the coast, he would then stand close enough to the box to be able to hear that the bell signals were being sent and received correctly. A couple of signalmen along the coast worked on ILC only, in other words, as soon as train was ready to be given TOS, they would flick straight over to ILC.

Totally irregular of course but with no regulating moves to be made, there was little actual danger. A ‘poke’ would alert next door or suddenly reverting to ‘proper’ working should any management be in the vicinity. Hove, Shoreham-by-Sea ‘B’, Lancing, Worthing, Goring, Angmering, Lyminster and Arundel Junction did booking, so cross checking of the TRBs could have been interesting.

We were allowed one transfer within the grade, so I transferred to Portslade in 1975; even nearer to home.

The box was finally abolished on Saturday 14th May 1988 with control transferring to Lancing panel 1.

Signalman Robey on duty in Shoreham-by-Sea ‘B’ Box

© Clive Robey

 

 

 

Shoreham-by-Sea B ‘CCE’

 

 

 

Distance in yards
from centre of box

2

Down Main Distant

5.6

800

4

For release of mechanical locking

 

Formerly FPL on 13 crossover

5

Down Main Home (Platform Starting)

4

4

6

Down Main Starting

 

716

7

To Goods Home (Platform Starting)

13. 8. 4

 

8

Goods Points

 

 

13

Up Down Main – Up Main to Down Main Points

 

 

19

For release of mechanical locking

 

Formerly FPL on 13 crossover

20

Gate Stops

 

13

21

Up Main Inner Home

19

672

22

Up Main Outer Home

 

1114

23

Up Main Distant

22. 21

1911

24

From Goods Home

8. 19

 

26

Gate Lock

 

 

 

Date of check: 12th September 1983

Diagram No: 1329

Dated: 11th September 1982

Brick built box: 1877

26 lever rocker frame (1877) relocked with tappets September 1902

Saxby & Frame 2699

Box opened: 1877

Box abolished: 1988

No. 32 gates (Buckingham Road)

Gates disconnected: 27th July 1985

Gates removed: 15th September 1985

Elevated frame

Closing switch: Nil

3 position closed block with dual cancelling to Shoreham-by-Sea ‘A’’ and Lancing

Arms repeated: 2. 6. 21. 22. 23

Lights repeated: 2

FPLs stand normally out

Backlock release on: 4. 5. 7 19. 21. 22. 24

 

 

Items in italics previously abolished but shown for info.

 

 

Released by

4

For release of mechanical locking

 

5

Down Main Home (Platform Starting)

4

6

Down Starting

 

19

For release of mechanical signalling

 

21

Up Main Home

19

22

For release of mechanical locking

 

23

Up Main Distant

22, 21

 

The above details were recorded on 23rd December 1987. Annoyingly, the release levers stood out of the frame until required to be operated, not good for the hips.

 

During this period Shoreham-by-Sea ‘B’ was not ‘allocated’ a signal box cat.

­­Thank you to Clive Robey for his memoires!

 

 

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