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London, Brighton & South Coast Railway
Crystal Palace ‘CP’ Units
‘Elevated Electric’ AC stock

 

Around the turn of the century, the London, Brighton & South Coast Railway (LBSCR) were concerned about falling traffic receipts in the suburban area and also wished to make economies in the costs of working their system. So, they began investigations into the feasibility of working their trains electrically. Electric operation of trains was now becoming quite practical and was indeed already in operation on a number of railways abroad and the LSWR had commenced limited electric operation in 1898 in the Waterloo & City Railway tube line.

The construction of further electrified tube railways in London and the parallel electrification of some competing tramway routes also spurred these investigations by the LBSCR and the company obtained an Act of Parliament in July 1903 to enable it to electrify parts of its system. Philip Dawson was retained as a consulting electrical engineer to investigate the most suitable system and from an early stage it was agreed that the system chosen should be suitable for use on possible future extensions of the system beyond the suburban area. Dawson took into account an earlier report to the LBSCR board presented in 1902 by the Chief Engineer which pointed out a number of disadvantages of the third rail system for the LBSCR network and presented a report to the board in July 1904 recommending the adoption of a single‑phase alternating current system at nominal 6,700 volts using overhead contact wire. The system was envisaged as suitable for the whole suburban network and with the possibility of later extensions should this be required.

Dawson was instructed to prepare plans for electrification of the lines between Battersea Park and Peckham Rye via the South London line and contracts were let in April 1905, awarded to the Allgemeine Elektricitats-Gesellschaft (AEG) of Berlin; this company sub‑contracting the overhead line work to Messrs R. W. Blackwell & Company of London, who in turn sub-contracted further with British Thomson‑Houston Co providing switchgear and Johnson & Philips also Siemens Bros providing cabling. Soon after these contracts were let, the LBSCR decided to extend the electrification scheme from Peckham Rye into London Bridge and from Battersea Park into Victoria so that the whole South London line route was covered, and further contracts were let to cover these extensions in March 1906. The rolling stock provision for the line was awarded to the Metropolitan Amalgamated Carriage & Wagon Company of Birmingham.

 

The Overhead

Power for the system was obtained from the London Electric Supply Corporation's generating station at Deptford and supplied at nominal 6,700 volts, 25 hertz via cables direct to a switch room at Queens Road, Peckham and a distribution room at Peckham Rye. Power was then distributed via lineside cables to switch cabins located at each station which supplied the overhead equipment. Wherever possible the current supply arrangements allowed one line to be isolated without having to isolate the adjacent track. The overhead lines were suspended at a contact height of 16' above rail level, though this was reduced under certain low bridges to 13' 9" (where there were ‘Dead’ sections) whilst in the vicinity of the platforms at Victoria and London Bridge the height was raised to 19' 9" to give greater clearances as staff still had to go onto carriage roofs to lamp oil lit stock or light gas lamps in some gas lit stock.

The contact wire was suspended from two catenaries; these being located one to each side and away from the centre line of the track to avoid damage to the insulators from the blast of locomotive chimneys. The catenaries were made of 12 strand galvanised steel and the droppers from these to the contact wire were formed as a stiff ‘V’ shape and were clipped to the contact wire by phosphor bronze clips. Droppers were spaced every 10' and held the copper contact wire off centre above the track with alternate deviations of 9" from the track centre line; this zig-zagging of the contact wire was designed to prevent the wire wearing a groove into the bow collectors of the trains.

The structures supporting the catenaries were mostly steel lattice gantries, the catenaries passing above these structures and supported on porcelain insulators, though there were some variations in the vicinity of overbridges. The overhead gantries were usually spaced about 150' apart, though some gaps were as small as 50' and the longest was 210' owing to siting difficulties.

Minimum clearance around the contact wire was specified at 3", though 4" was normally allowed, and the loading gauge height of the LBSCR was set at 13' 6" so the minimum height of the contact wire had to be set at 13' 9". As a consequence, there was a need for ‘Dead’ sections with the wire at this height under five overbridges on the electrified lines.

 

Crystal Palace Extension

The almost immediate success of the South London line electrification scheme which commenced from 1st December 1909 in raising passenger numbers on this line, led to the LBSCR board to quickly authorise the extension of electric working early in 1910. It was then planned to electrify the lines from Victoria to Crystal Palace via Clapham Jct. and Balham. The same main contractors who had been used for the South London scheme were again contracted for this scheme.

Electrification work commenced at Battersea Park (junction for the South London line) and only the two Local lines were electrified as far as the south end of Clapham Jct. station, then all four lines were equipped to the junction at Balham to allow an overtaking facility if required. The double track through Streatham Hill to the junction at Crystal Palace were equipped and the overheads were then taken into the London Bridge platforms at Crystal Palace and just beyond the station to allow trains to reverse into the centre sidings.

One of the sidings at Pigs Hill (Clapham Jct.) was electrified to enable trains to be reversed there from the south whilst the Up Bay platform was also equipped at Streatham Hill to enable trains from Victoria to reverse there if required. Two of the sidings on the down side were also electrified here for stock berthing.

 

Selhurst Maintenance Depot

Whilst this scheme was still in the planning stage, it was decided to extend the electrification still further. The nearest suitable site to the route for the building of a maintenance depot and berthing sidings was identified between Norwood Junction and Selhurst stations and a carriage shed and berthing sidings were laid out here with access from both the Norwood Jct. and Selhurst ends. To gain access to these facilities, electrification was then planned to be extended from the junction at Crystal Palace to Norwood Jct. and round the spur to Selhurst.

Wires were carried beyond Selhurst towards Thornton Heath to allow terminating trains to reverse back into the depot. The ‘Croydon’ bay platforms along with the Up Siding at Crystal Palace were also included. The line from Peckham Rye via Tulse Hill was also included, with electrification being taken around both the spur lines up to the junctions with the Crystal Palace line at Leigham Junction and West Norwood Junction.

Part of the new maintenance depot was built upon the former Selhurst cycle-racing track to the east of Selhurst Road and the London to Croydon Railway Line.

 

Overhead Line Extensions

Overhead equipment for these extensions was similar to that used on the South London lines, though of slightly lighter construction. However, there was a greater variety of supporting structures owing to various lineside constraints. In the tunnels at Leigham Court (Streatham Hill), Crystal Palace and Knights Hill (Tulse Hill) steel beams were let into the tunnel crowns and the insulators placed on these. Some section where the track was single (the spurs between Norwood Jct. and Bromley Jct.) used a simple pole and arm support.

Between Pouparts Jct. and Clapham Jct. it was not possible to find space for overhead supports between the LBSCR Main lines and the LSWR Local lines so this section had supports cantilevered out from uprights alongside the LBSCR Down Local line. These supports were extended across all four LBSCR tracks so that future wiring of the Main lines could be carried out easily if required. Sufficient space was left between the uprights of these gantries to allow a possible fifth road to be laid through them if widening of the section became necessary.

The centre line between Peckham Rye and London Bridge was also electrified as part of this scheme along with two further platforms at London Bridge (16 & 17). Power supply for these lines was again taken from the Deptford generating station of the London Electric Supply Corporation and large distribution cabins were built at both Peckham Rye and Tulse Hill. The switch cabins were spaced at greater distances than those on the original South London scheme.

 

Electric Services

Work on these extensions proceeded quickly and the line from Victoria to Crystal Palace via Streatham Hill was first worked electrically on 12th May 1911, this being the first day of a Festival of Empire exhibition at Crystal Palace. Services between Peckham Rye and Streatham Hill/West Norwood were planned to commence from 1st June 1912, the delay being due to the electricity supply company having to install more generating capacity to cope with the increased demand, however electric trains actually commenced from 1st March 1912 owing to a coal shortage following a miners strike, with the full service commencing in June.

Initial weekday train services over the new lines consisted of a twenty-minute frequency from Victoria to Crystal Palace from 7am to 8am, then stepping-up to ¼ hourly until 4pm, five trains per hour until 6pm, reverting to ¼ hourly until 9pm and every 20 minutes until the last train at midnight.

When the lines via Tulse Hill opened, a ¼ hourly service operated from London Bridge to Crystal Palace from 9am to 11am, then reducing to every 20 minutes until the last at 11 55pm. A service from London Bridge to Victoria via Streatham Hill operated every 20 minutes until 9 40am, then reducing to hourly until about 4pm when the 20-minute frequency resumed until 8 8pm when the trains went back to about hourly. During the middle part of the day some of the hourly London Bridge to Victoria trains terminated at either Streatham Hill or Clapham Jct.

 

‘CP’ Rolling Stock

Rolling stock for the new services was again contracted to the Metropolitan Amalgamated Carriage & Wagon Co Ltd (MAC&W) of Birmingham. Thirty new three-coach trains were needed for the service and therefore thirty motor brake thirds and thirty driving trailer composites were ordered from MAC&W whilst Lancing works was instructed to build a further twenty-six driving trailer composites. Owing to some tight clearances in Crystal Palace tunnel, the overall dimensions of these vehicles was restricted to bodies 8' 0" wide and 54' 0" long.

These coaches were built much more to LBSCR standards than the South London line stock, all accommodation being in compartments (no side corridors). Experience gained with the South London stock led to these trains being more flexible in operation, all vehicles having a driving cab at one end. There were fewer driving trailers than needed to make-up thirty complete trains, so formations constantly varied as more motor coaches were out of traffic for maintenance than trailer coaches.

All coaches were built on 54' underframes with bogie centres at 37', those of the motor coaches having the same style of heavy side girders as the SL units, whilst trailers had much lighter truss rods. All coaches were fitted with conventional buffers and screw couplings at each end. Bodies again had aluminium sheeting covering the roofs, sides and ends as a precaution against stray currents from the overhead equipment.

Bodysides had wooden beading dividing the panelling with two horizontal bands beneath the window line. Within this area, the vehicle numbers, compartment class (in words) and LBSCR lettering was displayed in gold letters. The vehicles were all painted in umber brown with yellow & black lining picking out the panelling.

Cab ends were quite plain, basically being a standard coach end with two large observation windows added. They had a similar arrangement to the SL units with an electric white light which could be covered by a red glass on a pivoting horizontal rod to provide head and tail indications. Between the cab windows a headcode panel was fitted into which an enamel plate displaying the required headcode could be clipped. These were illuminated from above by electric lamps hidden under a sloping hood. A whistle was fitted on the nearside of the driver's window.

Similar air hose connections to the SL stock were placed low down on the cab front close to the drawhook, three hoses for train pipe, main reservoir pipe & bow air systems. Jumper sockets were placed on the headstock, loose jumpers being used to connect these to adjacent vehicles when the cab was marshalled intermediately within a train.

Bodysides had a doorway into each compartment with the usual droplight within it, each compartment also having two ¼ light windows, one each side of the door. Each door had a ventilator above the droplight, those in smoking compartments having the vents at each end whilst those in non-smoking compartments had the vent along the lower edge. Internally the compartments were less ornate than those of the SL stock but still quite comfortable. First-class had a blue cloth upholstery whilst thirds had a red/black repp material. First-class seated four aside whilst thirds seated five aside. Each compartment had two electric lamps, and there were advert frames placed above the seats and below the luggage racks. Some compartments later had enamel adverts fixed to the inside of the doors below the droplights.

Overall, each CP 3-car train seated 48 first and 170 third and weighed 99 tons 6 cwt and was 172' 9" long.

Motor Coaches

Motor coaches consisted of a cab and brakevan area 11' 6" long, this having a double opening door on each side, the driver using these doors. Forward of these doors at the end of the bodyside there was a droplight window, the same size as those of normal doorway ones, though not fitted within a door, this for use of the driver. The driver operated from a cubicle in the front nearside corner of the brakevan area and there was an HT equipment cupboard below the offside observation window.

Beyond the brakevan area there were 7 third class compartments, each 5' 11" wide. The roof was again flattened above the brakevan and partly over the first passenger compartment to allow space for the bow collectors to be mounted above. Equipment below the underframes was very similar to that on the SL units although at 150hp the motors were more powerful; these again being from Winter‑Eichberg. These coaches were 57' 7" long over buffers and weighed 51 tons 6 cwt and seated 70 third. Their LBSCR diagram number was 282.

Driving Trailer Composites

Driving trailer composites consisted of a small driver's cab 4' 0½" wide, entered from either side via a standard door with droplight, there being no other side window to the cab. Behind this were three first class compartments 6' 6¾" wide and five third class compartments each 5' 10¼" wide. They weighed 24 tons and seated 24 first and 50 third. Their LBSCR diagram number was 283.

 

Train Formations

When first introduced the trains were formed with the motor coach at one end of two trailers, but operating experience soon saw this altered to having the motor coach in the centre with a driving trailer on each end. Many peak hour trains were made up to six coaches using two 3-car formations, and a few later ran as eight coaches with a six-car train having a further motor coach and trailer added to one end. These trains were maintained at the new Selhurst depot with some heavier work undertaken at Peckham Rye repair shops. Body overhauls were carried out at Lancing works.

Further coaches of both types were added to the fleet quite quickly (possibly as a result of the late alteration of plans to extend the electrification scheme) and a further four motor coaches and four trailers were constructed during 1912 by Metropolitan Carriage, Wagon & Finance Co. Ltd (the new name for the original builders) again at Saltley. Lancing Works built a further eight driving trailer composites (in two batches of four with the first delivered by June 1913, the second delivered by the end of 1913). Operation of the new trains was a success and traffic quickly grew by as much as 70%.

The LBSCR provided ‘Stopping Marks’ on white enamel plates with blue figures showing 2, 3, 5, 6 etc. as appropriate to indicate to drivers where to pull-up at each station, and ‘Coasting Marks’ consisting of a blue plate with a white cross were located (usually on an overhead support) on the approach to stations to show when power should be shut off and the train allowed to coast. These arrangements were also spread to the South London line.

 

War Years

During the First World War the electrified services suffered some curtailments, the Sunday trains from London Bridge to Crystal Palace being withdrawn and North Dulwich station closed on that day. Service patterns were adjusted and although basic frequencies remained unchanged the services did not run to a ‘clockface’ regular interval pattern.

The onset of war also stopped progress with the next phase of the LBSCR's extension of electrification which included the lines from London Bridge to Norwood Jct. via Forest Hill and the Sydenham Spur to Crystal Palace, the lines from Balham to Cheam via both Mitcham Jct. and Norbury and the lines from Selhurst /Norwood Jct. to Coulsdon North.

However, a number of driving trailer vehicles for use on these lines had been authorised for construction at Lancing and work on these had commenced. These were very similar to those produced for the CP stock, the difference being that they included four first and four third class compartments. Two of these coaches were therefore allocated to the CP fleet, these coaches seating 32 first and 40 third, altering the capacity of any unit in which they were formed to 56 first and 160 third.

 

Southern Railway

After the war, much of the further extension of the electrification scheme was implemented by the Southern Railway though it only had a short life as the SR had very early on decided to standardise on the ‘750v’ DC Third Rail system of electrification.

These extensions (the Coulsdon & Wallington scheme) completed the final expansion of the LBSCR's overhead system and the extra stock allocated to work it became known as the CW (Coulsdon & Wallington) stock. The two CW driving trailers earlier allocated to the CP fleet however remained working on these routes. Once the extensions had been completed (in 1925) some of the CP stock could be found working further afield, they certainly worked to East Croydon, though they remained basically on their original services.

From 1924, the CP fleet was renumbered into a new series by the SR as vehicles were overhauled at Lancing works. At this time, they were also repainted green and the new livery also changed the location of the coach numbers, now being placed much higher up the bodyside, and figures appeared on the lower panels of the doors to denote the class designation of that compartment. However, not all vehicles were dealt with before the CP fleet began to be withdrawn, this taking place during the latter part of 1928 and all were out of service by mid-1929, as their routes were converted to DC operation.

 

Conversion of ‘CP’ stock to DC Operation

All the coaches were then stripped of various items of AC equipment at Peckham Rye and then reused in various ways as part of the expanding fleet of DC electric units.

The motor brake thirds were converted at Lancing into trailer thirds. The bodies remained on their original girder trussed underframes, the former cab and brakevan area being removed and replaced with two further third-class compartments, making these vehicles into 54' long 9-compartment coaches and they were used in trailer units 1168 ‑ 1187.

The driving trailer composites were converted in three different ways, 14 of them becoming motor brake composites, this involving a new cab and brakevan being added to the former third-class end of the coach, one of the original third-class compartments being replaced during this alteration. The former cab at the other end was removed. In this form they then had four third and three first compartments.

Conversion work took place at both Ashford and Eastleigh and the altered bodies were removed from their 54' underframes and these were then lengthened to 62' 0" and the bodies replaced on them, though they did not go back onto their original frame, seven going onto new Lancing built underframes. These new motor coaches were then formed into units 1717 ‑ 1727 and 1737 ‑ 1739.

A further two driving trailer composites were altered to 54' trailer thirds at Lancing with little alteration to the bodies other than downgrading the former first-class compartments to third and converting the former cab into a coupe compartment seating 5. These 8½ compartment coaches were then formed into trailer units 1182 and 1183.

The remaining 52 driving trailer composites were rebuilt as 62' 0" trailer composites, again the work was split between Ashford and Eastleigh. Bodies were removed from their underframes which were then lengthened to 62' 0” and the rebuilt bodies replaced onto them, again not onto their original frames. Body alterations involved replacing the original cab with a further first-class compartment and the addition of a further third-class compartment at the other end. In this form they now had four first and six third compartments and were included in new DC units 1717 ‑ 1768.

The two odd CW driving trailer composites used as part of the CP fleet since 1914 were altered as 54' long trailer thirds with the former cab being converted into a coupe compartment seating 5 and the four first class compartments downgraded to third. These two coaches were then included in trailer units 1184 and 1185, conversion work took place at Lancing.

The following lists show details of the CP fleet, with coaches listed in their original number order. Details of builder, new date and subsequent SR ‘AC’ number with date of renumbering (where appropriate) are shown along with the date of conversion to ‘DC’, the works responsible for the conversion, their new numbers, new unit and type of vehicle conversion. Nearly all the DTCs had their bodies split from the underframes whilst the frames were lengthened, they did not go back onto their original frames and the new number of the body is shown above the number of the vehicle that the underframe was used under. The ‘new’ date of coaches is as reported by the LBSCR accounting system which recorded half-yearly (June & December); the actual build dates would have been more spread.

 

 

CP Motor Brake Thirds
LBSCR Diagram No. 282, SR Diagram No 676

 

Coach No.

Built

Date

SR ‘AC’ No.

Date Renum.

Date Rebuilt

Works

SR ‘DC’ No.

Unit

Type

3231

MACW

1911

8567

Jul-24

Jul-30

LANC

9294

1187

TT

3232

MACW

1911

8568

Sep-26

Aug-29

LANC

9265

1172

TT

3233

MACW

1911

8569

Dec-25

Jan-30

LANC

9280

1180

TT

3234

MACW

1911

8570

May-26

Aug-29

LANC

9267

1173

TT

3235

MACW

1911

8571

Jan-28

Mar-30

LANC

9291

1185

TT

3236

MACW

1911

8572

Jan-27

Jul-29

LANC

9259

1169

TT

3237

MACW

1911

8573

Dec-24

Jul-29

LANC

9262

1171

TT

3238

MACW

1911

8574

Mar-25

Jul-30

LANC

9295

1187

TT

3239

MACW

1911

8475

Mar-27

Aug-29

LANC

9269

1174

TT

3240

MACW

1911

8476

Sep-26

Sep-29

LANC

9275

1177

TT

3241

MACW

1911

8477

Dec-24

Aug-29

LANC

9271

1175

TT

3242

MACW

1911

8478

May-24

Feb-30

LANC

9287

1183

TT

3243

MACW

1911

8579

Dec-25

Jan-30

LANC

9278

1179

TT

3244

MACW

1911

8580

May-26

Jul-29

LANC

9260

1170

TT

3245

MACW

1911

8581

Jun-27

Jul-29

LANC

9263

1171

TT

3246

MACW

1911

(8582)

-

Jul-29

LANC

9256

1168

TT

3247

MACW

1911

8583

Sep-25

Feb-30

LANC

9285

1182

TT

3248

MACW

1911

8584

Jun-27

Aug-29

LANC

9266

1173

TT

3240

MACW

1911

8585

Sep-27

Jul-29

LANC

9261

1170

TT

3250

MACW

1911

8586

Oct-24

Sep-29

LANC

9272

1176

TT

3251

MACW

1911

8587

Sep-27

Feb-30

LANC

9289

1184

TT

3252

MACW

1911

8588

May-24

Aug-29

LANC

9270

1175

TT

3253

MACW

1911

8589

Oct-24

Sep-29

LANC

9273

1176

TT

3254

MACW

1911

8590

Jan-27

Sep-29

LANC

9276

1178

TT

3255

MACW

1911

8591

Jun-25

Sep-29

LANC

9277

1178

TT

3256

MACW

1911

8592

Jan-24

Aug-29

LANC

9268

1174

TT

3257

MACW

1911

8593

Jun-25

Aug-29

LANC

9264

1172

TT

3258

MACW

1911

8594

Oct-25

Jul-29

LANC

9258

1169

TT

3259

MACW

1911

8595

Jul-24

Sep-29

LANC

9274

1177

TT

3260

MACW

1911

(8596)

-

Jan-30

LANC

9281

1180

TT

3261

MCWF

1912

8597

Apr-27

Jul-29

LANC

9257

1168

TT

3262

MCWF

1912

8598

Jan-24

Jan-30

LANC

9279

1179

TT

3263

MCWF

1912

8599

Jan-28

Feb-30

LANC

9283

1181

TT

3264

MCWF

1912

8600

Mar-25

Mar-30

LANC

9293

1186

TT

 

 

CP Driving Trailer Composites
LBSCR Diagram No.283, SR Diagram No.791

 

Coach No.

Built

Date

SR ‘AC’ No.

Date Renum.

Date Rebuilt

Works

SR ‘DC’ No.

Unit

Type

4001

MACW

Jun-11

9825

Sep-25

Aug-29
Aug-29

ELGH

9749
9745

1749
1745

TC
TC

4002

MACW

Jun-11

9826

Sep-25

Jul-29
Sep-29

AFD

9732
9730

1732
1730

TC
TC

4003

MACW

Jun-11

9827

Feb-25

22-Mar-30
22-Apr-30

AFD

9476
9479

1765
1768

TC
TC

4004

MACW

Jun-11

9828

Apr-25

Jun-29
May-29

ELGH

9742
9725

1742
1733

TC
TC

4005

MACW

1911

9829

Sep-26

Jun-29

ELGH

8874
8861

1739
1726

MBC
MBC

4006

MACW

Jun-11

9830

May-24

Jan-29
Jan-29

AFD

9719
9717

1719
1717

TC
TC

4007

MACW

Jun-11

9831

Jul-24

Feb-30
1-Jan-30

AFD

9468
9461

1757
1750

TC
TC

4008

MACW

Jun-11

9832

Jan-24

Jan-29
Jun-29

AFD

9717
9728

1717
1778

TC
TC

4009

MACW

Jun-11

9833

Oct-25

Jun-29

AFD

9726
8873

1726
1738

TC
MCB

4010

MACW

Jun-11

9834

Jun-27

Sep=29
Aug-29

AFD

9730
9734

1730
1734

TC
TC

4011

MACW

Jun-11

9835

Jan-24

Feb-29

AFD

9720
8707

1720
1738

TC
MBT

4012

MACW

1911

9836

Sep-26

Jun-29

ELGH

8873
8693

1738
1724

MBC
MBT

4013

MACW

Jun-11

9837

Sep-26

May-29
Jun-29

AFD

8598
9738

1724
1738

MBC
TC

4014

MACW

Jun-11

9838

Feb-24

1-Jan-30
29-Mar-30

AFD

9462
9477

1751
1766

TC
TC

4015

MACW

Jun-11

9839

Sep-26

Jun-29
Aug-29

ELGH

9738
9749

1738
1749

TC
TC

4016

MACW

Jun-11

9840

Jun-27

5-Apr-30
Feb-30

AFD

9478
9472

1767
1761

TC
TC

4017

MACW

1911

9841

Apr-27

Feb-30

LANC

9284

1182

TT

4018

MACW

Jun-11

9842

Mar-25

May-29
Jun-29

AFD

9725
9726

1725
1726

TC
TC

4019

MACW

Jun-11

9843

Sep-24

Aug-29
Aug-29

AFD

9736
9735

1736
1735

TC
TC

4020

MACW

Jun-11

9844

Dec-24

Feb-30
Feb-30

AFD

9463
9469

1752
1758

TC
TC

4021

MACW

Jun-11

9845

Sep-27

Jun-29
May-29

AFD

9737
9724

1737
1724

TC
TC

4022

MACW

Jun-11

(9846)

-

Feb-29
Jan-29

AFD

8856
9718

1721
1718

MBC
TC

4023

MACW

1911

9847

Apr-27

Jun-29

AFD

8862
8860

1727
1725

MBC
MBC

4024

MACW

Jun-11

9848

Jun-27

May-29
Jun-29

AFD

9724
9727

1724
1727

TC
TC

4025

MACW

1911

9849

Oct-27

Jun-29

AFD

8861
8706

1726
1737

MBC
MBT

4026

MACW

Jun-11

9850

Sep-27

Jul-29
Jun-29

ELGH

9743
9741

1743
1741

TC
TC

4027

MACW

Jun-11

9851

Oct-27

Jun-29

AFD

9727
8694

1727
1725

TC
MBT

4028

MACW

Jun-11

9852

Jan-28

Feb-30
Mar-30

AFD

9470
9473

1759
1762

TC
TC

4029

MACW

Jun-11

9853

Apr-26

Jun-29

AFD

9728
8695

1728
1726

TC
MBT

4030

MACW

Jun-11

9854

Jan-24

Feb-29
Jan-29

AFD

8854
9719

1719
1719

MBC
TC

4032

LANC

Jun-11

9855

Dec-25

Aug-29
Aug-29

AFD

9734
9746

1734
1746

TC
TC

4032

LANC

1911

9856

Jun-Jan-28

Feb-30

LANC

9286

1183

TT

4033

LANC

Jun-11

9857

Jan-27

May-29
Jun-29

AFD

8860
9739

1725
1739

MBC
TC

4034

LANC

Jun-11

(9858)

-

Feb-29

AFD

9721
8708

1721
1739

TC
MBT

4035

LANC

Jun-11

9859

Jan-28

1-Jan-30
1-Jan-30

AFD

9467
9466

1756
1755

TC
TC

4036

LANC

Jun-11

9860

Jan-24

Jan-29
Feb-29

AFD

8853
9720

1718
1720

MBC
TC

4037

LANC

Jun-11

9861

Feb-25

Jun-29

AFD

9729
8862

1729
1727

TC
MBC

4038

LANC

Jun-11

9862

Jul-24

Feb-30
5-Apr-30

AFD

9469
9478

1758
1767

TC
TC

4039

LANC

Jun-11

9863

Jan-27

1-Jan-30
Feb-30

AFD

9461
9464

1750
1753

TC
TC

4040

LANC

Jun-11

9864

Dec-24

1-Jan-30
1-Jan-30

AFD

9466
9465

1755
1754

TC
TC

4041

LANC

Jun-11

9865

Jan-24

Feb-29
Jun-29

AFD

9723
9740

1723
1740

TC
TC

4042

LANC

Jun-11

9866

Feb-25

Sep-29
Jul-29

AFD

9731
9743

1731
1743

TC
TC

4043

LANC

Jun-11

9867

Jul-24

Jun-29
Aug-29

ELGH

9741
9736

1741
1736

TC
TC

4044

LANC

Jun-11

9868

Dec-24

Feb-30
1-Jan-30

AFD

9464
9462

1753
1751

TC
TC

4045

LANC

Jun-11

9869

Sep-25

1-Jan-30
1-Jan-30

AFD

9465
9467

1754
1756

TC
TC

4046

LANC

Jun-11

9870

Jun-27

Mar-30
Mar-30

AFD

9473
9474

1762
1763

TC
TC

4047

LANC

Jun-11

9871

Jun-25

Aug-29
Jul-29

ELGH

9747
9732

1747
1732

TC
TC

4048

LANC

Jun-11

9872

May-24

Jan-29
Jun-29

AFD

9718
9737

1718
1737

TC
TC

4049

LANC

Jun-11

9873

Jun-25

12-Apr-30
Feb-30

AFD

9479
9468

1768
1757

TC
TC

4050

LANC

1911

9874

Jan-24

Feb-29

AFD

8855
8872

1720
1737

MBC
MBC

4051

LANC

Jun-11

9875

Jan-27

Mar-30
Feb-30

AFD

9474
9463

1763
1752

TC
TC

4052

LANC

Jun-11

9876

Jun-25

29-Mar-30
Feb-30

AFD

9477
9470

1766
1759

TC
TC

4053

LANC

Jun-11

9877

Apr-26

Aug-29
Aug-29

ELGH

9748
9748

1748
1748

TC
TC

4055

LANC

Jun-11

9878

Jan-27

Jul-29
Jun-29

AFD

9733
9742

1733
1742

TC
TC

4056

LANC

Jun-11

(9879)

-

Feb-29
Feb-29

AFD

9722
9721

1722
1721

TC
TC

4057

LANC

Jun-11

(9880)

-

Feb-29
Jun-29

AFD

8858
9729

1723
1729

MBC
TC

4061

MCWF

1912

9881

Oct-24

Jun-29

ELGH

8872
8859

1737
1724

MBC
MBC

4062

MCWF

Dec-12

9882

Jul-24

Aug-29
Jul-29

AFD

9735
9733

1735
1733

TC
TC

4063

MCWF

Dec-12

9883

May-24

Feb-29
Feb-29

AFD

8857
9722

1722
1722

MBC
TC

4064

MCWF

Dec-12

9884

Oct-24

Jun-29

ELGH

9739
8696

1739
1727

TC
MBT

4065

LANC

Jun-13

9885

Jan-26

Feb-30
Feb-30

AFD

9471
9471

1760
1760

TC
TC

4066

LANC

Jun-13

9886

Dec-25

Feb-30
15-Mar-30

AFD

9472
9475

1761
1764

TC
TC

4067

LANC

Jun-13

9887

May-26

Jul-29
Jul-29

ELGH

9744
9744

1744
1744

TC
TC

4068

LANC

Jun-13

9888

Oct-25

15-Mar-30
22-Mar-30

AFD

9475
9476

1764
1765

TC
TC

4069

LANC

Dec-13

9889

Dec-25

Aug-29
Aug-29

ELGH

9746
9747

1746
1747

TC
TC

4070

LANC

Dec-13

9890

Jan-28

Aug-29
Sep-29

ELGH

9745
9731

1745
1731

TC
TC

4071

LANC

Dec-13

9891

Apr-26

Jun-29

ELGH

9740
8874

1740
1739

TC
MBC

4072

LANC

Dec-13

9892

May-24

Jan-29
Jan-29

AFD

8852
9723

1717
1723

MBC
TC

 

 

CP Driving Trailer Composites
LBSCR Diagram No.284, SR Diagram No.792

 

Coach No.

Built

Date

SR ‘AC’ No.

Date Renum.

Date Rebuilt

Works

SR ‘DC’ No.

Unit

Type

4084

LANC

1914

9893

Apr-27

Feb-30

LANC

9288

1184

TT

4085

LANC

1914

9894

Apr-27

Feb-30

LANC

9290

1185

TT

 

 

­­Thanks go to John Atkinson for researching and preparing this article and C.Watts for editorial content.

In memory of J.F. Watts and his childhood recollections of the ‘CP’ rolling stock “with their great big bow-collectors”.

 

 

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