BR British Rail Crimson & Cream Crimson and Cream Crimson Cream Blood & Custard Blood Custard Blood and Custard BR British Rail Crimson & Cream Crimson and Cream Crimson Cream Blood & Custard Blood Custard Blood and Custard BR British Rail Crimson & Cream Crimson and Cream Crimson Cream Blood & Custard Blood Custard Blood and Custard

 

© BloodandCustard

London & South Western Railway
Waterloo & City Line
(1898 Stock)

 

© Brian Hardy collection

 

New Electric Railway
‘The Drain’

The very first electrified railway on the lines of the constituent companies (which later formed the Southern Railway) opened on the 8th August 1898. This was the purpose-built tube line of the Waterloo & City Railway, only 1m 46ch long between Waterloo and Bank, an independent company supported by the London & South Western Railway (LSWR) to provide this company with direct access to the City of London. Up until this time all the city-bound passengers of this company had to make their way onwards from Waterloo on foot, by bus or on the South Eastern Railway service between Waterloo Junction and Cannon Street.

 Construction of this line began in 1894 and required extensive underpinning works at Waterloo where the new platforms lay below the concourse at right angles to the surface platforms. The line then curved sharply right northwards from Waterloo and fell to pass beneath the River Thames, rising again towards the terminus at Bank Station. South of the Waterloo platforms the line continued into sidings which provided the maintenance depot for the line, whilst just north of Waterloo on the Up Line, a connecting tunnel led from a 30-ton Armstrong hoist which gave access to the North Sidings alongside the main Waterloo station. This hoist allowed access for the rolling stock used on the line.

Construction

This early pioneer tube railway was constructed using tubes of 12' 1¾" diameter, though these were increased to 12' 9" diameter on some of the sharper curved sections; the tunnels were lined with concrete to reduce noise transmission. Standard Gauge track was laid, using 87 lb. a yard rail and a central conductor rail was provided, power being supplied from a purpose-built coal-fired generating station located at Waterloo at 530v DC. The conductor and running rails were laid on longitudinal sleepers in the running tunnels, whilst both platforms at the Bank end were located in a 23' diameter tunnel; the tracks being laid outside the central platform with a crossover chamber located at the Waterloo end of the station. Two separate platforms were provided at Waterloo being located on the outside of the running lines with a central dividing wall.

Seven berthing sidings were provided beyond the platforms at Waterloo, all seven-having access to the Up platform, though only sidings 4 to 7 could be accessed from the Down platform. The power station was located alongside No. 1 siding which had a wagon turntable to allow coal wagons access to the plant, these wagons having to be lowered via the Armstrong hoist and worked through the Up platform to gain access to the sidings. Depot facilities sufficient to carry out routine maintenance on the stock were provided in these sidings, but the coaches were taken to the surface via the hoist and worked away to Eastleigh for major overhauls.

When the line was first opened, these sidings were mostly in the open, but much of the area was covered over during the reconstruction of the main line station from 1903, with the Spur Road connecting Lower Marsh with the Approach Road covering a further part of the yard as it curved round past the Power Station.

Power Supply

The central conductor rail was an inverted steel channel mounted on porcelain insulators with its top surface level with the running rails, wooden ramps being provided at switch & crossings to raise the collector shoes on the train 1½" to clear the running rails. The initial power supply arrangements were quite short lived, as following the first stages of the main line electrification into Waterloo in 1915, power for the Waterloo & City was then supplied by the much larger Power Station at Durnsford Road, though part of the original generating capacity was retained for standby purposes with the Power Station remaining in use supplying hot water and steam to parts of the main station buildings at Waterloo.

Signalling

Signalling on the new line was manual and Sykes ‘lock-&-block’ was provided as were intermediate lamp signals in the running tunnels. These intermediate signals were equipped with an early form of automatic train control, a short length of insulated rail laid approximately in the position of the later third rail was earthed when the signal was at danger and a wire brush wiper on the motor bogie of the train made contact with this rail, which if earthed caused the traction supply on the train to trip out thereby cutting off traction power.

 

Jackson & Sharp Stock

The initial rolling stock supplied to work the line consisted of five 4-car trains formed Motor + Trailer + Trailer + Motor, this stock being built in the USA by Jackson & Sharp at Wilmington and shipped over in component form and assembled at the LSWR workshops at Eastleigh. At this stage, there was greater experience with electric ‘Subway’ style trains in the USA, as the only other ‘tube’ line in Britain was the City & South London Railway which commenced operation in 1890 from Stockwell to King William Street and used electric locomotives to haul the passenger coaches.

The Waterloo & City stock was wooden bodied and mounted on low steel underframes, these being cranked-up over both bogies to give clearance, the floor height above the motor bogies being 3' 2", though the floors were flat with the rest of the car above trailer bogies. The low car floors meant that the wheels projected above floor level resulting in longitudinal seating being provided at each end of all vehicles above the wheel pockets.

All vehicles were fitted with roller bearing axleboxes, one of the first examples of such fittings for a whole fleet of vehicles. The motor bogies had a 6' 0" wheelbase whilst the trailer bogies were 5' 6", and bogie centres were at 25' 6" on both types of coach.

The bodies of the coaches had flat matchboard panelling below the waistline, above this level the bodyside tapered inwards and there were a large number of almost square fixed windows along the length of the coach, sixteen on trailer coaches, fourteen on motor coaches. Above each window was a ventilation slot covered by a wooden louvre, and the roof shape above this was an arc.

Lighting was by carbon filament lamps with groups of four being connected in series across the 530v supply. Originally two oil lamps were also carried in each coach for emergency purposes, these later being replaced by storage batteries to supply the lighting, these batteries requiring regular removal for recharging. However, no form of train heating was fitted.

These trains were fitted with automatic air brakes, each coach having a long air reservoir cylinder underneath. There were no compressors to supply these fitted to the trains, a large supply reservoir at Waterloo being supplied from pumps in the power station, and the air supply on the trains was topped-up from these at regular intervals, the cylinders on the trains holding sufficient air for approximately twenty trips. A handbrake was fitted in each driving cab. Each vehicle was painted in a dark brown livery with panelling picked out with lining, two thin gold lines with square corners.

 The exact lengths and weights of these vehicles is unknown, though motor coaches weighed just under 29 tons and trailers about 15¾ tons, they were all 41' 0" long over the bodies (this did not include the width of the platforms at each end), these being 2' 7¾" wide at the non-driving end of the motor coaches and both ends of each trailer, whilst the main line height buffer beam was 1' 8" ahead of the body front at the cab end with the lower level buffer beam projecting a further 1' 5½" beyond that.  The coaches were 8' 6" wide overall, though the sliding doors on the motor coaches came outside this nominal width. Overall length of the motor coaches was therefore about 46' 9¼" and the trailers 46' 3½", whilst the overall height from rail level was 9' 7.5/8".

Platform heights on the line were set at 1' 6" which matched the floor level of the lower section of the motor coaches and the whole of the trailers and access platforms. Each train had seats for two-hundred and four passengers and standing space for about that number again, and weighed about 105 tons loaded.

Five trains and two spare motor coaches were therefore available and all five trains were needed to maintain the service in the peak periods. The service had to be reduced every few years for periods when the trains were taken one by one to Eastleigh for major overhauls, but other than for this reason, this stock proved successful and provided a reliable service. Motor coaches were numbered 1 ‑ 12, whilst the trailers were numbered 21 ‑ 30.

Motor Coaches (Singled-ended)

The motor coaches had two Siemens 42hp motors in one bogie, this being at the driving end of the coach, these motors were gearless having their armatures wound directly on the axles which had 33”-disc wheels, the large field windings being supported by the bogie frame. An equipment cabinet was located in the centre of the driving cab, partly above the motor bogie, in which other electrical and control equipment was located. Resistances were suspended below the main line height buffer beam behind the tube level one in clear air for cooling.

At this stage in the development of electric traction, the control equipment was quite primitive, and the hand operated controllers at each end of the train were connected by a bus line linking the positive shoes throughout the train. Altogether eleven control cables were run along the train (via the car roofs) as each motor required four cables, two for the armature and two for the field. When not in use, the controller at the rear of the train was locked, this also connected the through cables to the rear traction motors enabling them to be controlled from the front.

The controllers did not have a ‘deadman’ facility when new and therefore two drivers were provided in the cab of trains until this facility was installed, authorisation for installation of this modification being given during July 1903. The provision of power cables down the train was unique to the Waterloo & City stock as this practise was later banned by the Board of Trade Inspecting Officer as too dangerous with the possibility of fire risk on other tube lines. However, it served this stock well.

Each motor coach seated forty-six passengers, with longitudinal seats each side for three behind the equipment compartment on the raised floor section, a pair of two-aside transverse seats facing the trailing end of the vehicle, the door opening each side. This was followed by three bays of two-aside face to face transverse seating, then further longitudinal seats for six above the wheel pockets at the trailing end.

At the cab ends, a driver's observation window was located each side in the top portion of a door which could be used for emergency access onto the end platform, these windows (and the door itself) tapered towards the top due to the body shape. There was a larger central window between these, being a square though with the top edge rounded to follow the roof profile Below this central window was an equipment cabinet, the top of which was rounded to approximate the curvature of the roof line. This cabinet projected back into the cab and forward about 1' 8" in the form of a small snout. An air whistle was provided, but as the cars ran only underground, no window wipers were fitted.

At the lower part of the cab front the underframe members sloped downwards to a cross beam at tube coupler height. Above this were two buffers at main line height for use when the trains were hauled on the surface to and from Eastleigh works, and a conventional drawhook was located between these buffers immediately below the equipment cabinet. Two electric red head /tail lights were also fitted, the Waterloo & City also being unique in using red lights for a head indication as well as the tail indication.

Trailer Coaches

Access to the trailer coaches was only at each end, where the underframe projected beyond the bodywork and formed an open veranda. Motor coaches had a similar veranda at the non-driving end, and collapsible trellis gates were provided joining the bodywork of the two adjacent vehicles when extended to secure the access route when the train was ready to move, there then being three of these access points along a 4-car train. Motor coaches also had a manually operated sliding door just behind the motor bogie, this having a similar sized window to those of the bodyside and did not disrupt the regular pattern of these windows.

The trailers seated 56 passengers, these having longitudinal seats for six at each end above the wheel pockets and four bays of two-aside face to face transverse seats in the centre part of the coach. Seating throughout the train was wooden with no padding and wooden armrests were provided dividing the seats into the numbers shown above. Where longitudinal seating was located, there were wooden poles fitted to the roofs with leather straps suspended from them for standing passengers. The windows behind the longitudinal seats were also protected by two metal bars above the seat tops.

 

Procurement and Delivery

The tender from Jackson & Sharp to build the stock for the LSWR was accepted on 1st April 1897 and construction proceeded rapidly of the carriage bodies and the trailer cars were ready in early October 1897 and shipped to Southampton with the motor cars expected to follow about three weeks later.

The first five cars were being assembled at Eastleigh by 28th October 1897 and the first complete train was ready (unpowered) by 21st November. A partly finished skeleton coach body was taken through the new tunnels on 6th January 1898 and the whole line surveyed by 17th February 1898.

Siemens' contractors (who were responsible for installing the electrical equipment) were on site at the Waterloo depot fitting out the trains, the first complete train of 4 carriages was moved from Eastleigh to Waterloo on 4th March 1898. The second was expected about two weeks later and the third to follow in mid-April 1898.

Into Service

The Armstrong hoist was ready for use by the end of April 1898 and seven coaches were lowered onto the W&C. The first trial trip of two motor coaches took place on 4th June 1898, with an official opening ceremony on 11th July 1898. The line opened to the public on 8th August 1898 using four trains, the fifth being available from the end of September 1898. The initial service commenced at 8 0am from both ends of the line and ran at five-minute intervals throughout the day until 10 0pm. Four trains were used for much of the day, with five in use during the peak hours, reducing to three in the evenings.

From the outset, the trains were identified by the letters ‘A’ to ‘E’ for operating purposes. Even after the trains had been modified to operate with only one man in the cab, each train still required a crew of five, the driver, the guard in the rear cab and a conductor stationed at each of the three sets of open platforms to control the gates.

Service Frequency

Prior to the introduction of the single cars, the service operated, using four of the 4-car trains, every 6 mins from 8 0am to 11 0am and again from 4 0pm to 7 0pm and at a 10-minute frequency between the peaks and from 7 0pm to 10 0pm, this using two of the trains. The single cars allowed a five-minute frequency to be operated off-peak using three of the cars. The service frequency was increased from May 1904, with five 4-car trains in use between 7 30am to 10 30am and again from 4 0pm until 7 30pm and four of the single cars between 10 30am and 4 0pm with three in use during the evening.

Motor Upgrades

The new trains soon proved to be somewhat underpowered with the journey time being about 6½ minutes rather than just under 5 minutes as planned and proven during early test runs with the stock. This was partly due to the imposition of a permanent 15MPH speed restriction around the sharp curves at the lowest point of the line; a recommendation by the Inspecting Officer from the Board of Trade when the line was inspected prior to opening. This meant that trains had to brake for the speed restriction and then accelerate away again up the incline from a lower speed than had originally been intended.

During 1899, Siemens supplied eight new motors of higher power (60hp); enough to equip two of the trains. In addition, a spare motor and trailer bogie frame was provided to minimise the time coaches were out-of-service for bogie changes. Some consideration was given to altering the method of working from motor cars to locomotive haulage and converting the existing motor coaches to trailers. One of the spare motor coaches was stripped of electrical equipment for a time in 1899 in connection with these proposals. However, the original form of operation continued. In 1903 all the motor coaches were equipped with new 35" spoked driving wheels and presumably at this time all gained the 60hp variety of motor as well.

 

Dick Kerr Motor Coaches (Double-ended)

The four-coach trains did prove excessive for the slack hour traffic and a batch of five further motor coaches were authorised in October 1898 and ordered in the spring of 1899; these being delivered to Waterloo on 18th February 1900. The first car was tested on 3rd March 1899 and found to be satisfactory; all having been tested by 25th April 1900 and going into traffic from 2nd May 1900. They were constructed in Preston by Dick Kerr & Co. Ltd (later part of English Electric).

These motor coaches differed from the 1898 motor coaches by being provided with a driving cab at each end, whilst the rapid advances in the development of electrical equipment resulted in these coaches having two axle-hung motors, one mounted on the outermost axle of each bogie (the English Electric type 15L 75hp motor being used). Both bogies were of 5' 6" wheelbase with 33" disc wheels and the bogie centres were at 31' 0".

The bodystyle of these coaches was broadly similar to that of the earlier stock but two sliding doors were provided each side ( just inboard of the bogies for passenger access) with both doors sliding towards the centre of the coach. They had outside handles and recessed handles on the inside, though the inside ones were later replaced by a key lock to place them under the control of the guard who rode in the car.

The seats in these vehicles were again wooden and did not have armrests dividing the transverse seats, though there were some in the longitudinal seats. These coaches had fifty seats and there was one intermediate partition with a sliding door in the centre of the coach.

In the raised floor sections at each end were nine seats, all longitudinal with six along the offside, the forward three of these being alongside the cab compartment, with a shorter seat for three on the nearside behind the cab compartment. The lower floor section had four bays of two aside face to face seating for thirty-two, the space between the seats being much wider in the outermost bays where the sliding doors were located.

The cab ends also differed from the earlier vehicles by having only one driver's observation window on the nearside, of similar shape to those of the earlier stock and an adjacent rectangular window. Offside of this was a sliding wooden emergency access door, this covering the rectangular window when opened. These coaches also had the low-level cross beam at tube coupler height but not the main line level buffers or drawhook. They operated with the powered bogie at the Bank end of the coach and always ran singly, not being able to run in multiple with other vehicles.

The equipment was much more compact than on the 1898 cars allowing a much smaller drivers compartment in the front nearside corner at each end. Overall length of these coaches was 45' 0" over body and 47' 0" overall. Once again, no compressors were fitted to the trains, the reservoirs having capacity for about 15 return trips between recharging at Waterloo. These coaches were numbered 13 ‑ 17 and finished in the same livery style as the original stock.

 

Electric Tramway Company Trailer Cars

Two further trailers were built in 1904 by the Electric Tramway Company, again at Preston as spares for the 4-car trains. Identical to the original trailer coaches, these were numbered 31 & 32.

 

London & South Western Railway Ownership

The Waterloo & City Railway Company was absorbed by the LSWR from 1st January 1907, there was little immediate change in operations of the W&C line. However, the main line station above the W&C platforms was greatly enlarged between 1909 and 1919, expanding over most of the sidings at Waterloo thereby covering them in.

 

London & South Western Railway Trailer Cars

Increasing peak hour traffic led to a further order for trailers being placed, these being built at Eastleigh works in 1922 to the original design. These coaches enabled the five trains to be made-up to five coaches each, still leaving two motor coaches and one trailer as spares. As five coach trains, seats were now provided for 260 passengers.

The new trailer coaches were numbered 33 to 36. SR diagram numbers were allocated to all the Waterloo & City stock, the original motor coaches becoming 840, the single motor coaches 841 whilst all the trailers were 845. The seats in all coaches were later fitted with rather thin upholstery. The service frequency, which had been steadily increased owing to increasing passenger numbers was further increased in the peaks from 3 minutes to every 2½ minutes.

Trailers usually ran in number sequences from 1922.

 

Final Formations

A

10

21

22

23

9

B

8

24

25

26

5

C

6

27

28

29

12

D

4

31

32

33

2

E

3

34

35

36

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spare

1

11

30

 

 

 

(+ 13 - 17 for slack hour services).

 

Incidents

Incidents affecting the stock were few and fairly minor. Trailer car no.28 was slightly damaged by a fire on an adjacent walkway in the depot sidings 2nd April 1922, and a motor coach was derailed about 100 yards short of the City station 27th April 1922 caused by the breakage of a motor axle. There was also a minor fire in the cables joining two of the coaches of a train 18th November 1924 whilst it was travelling between City and Waterloo. Another derailment caused by the breakage of a motor axle took place on 5th November 1926 when the rear coach of a train was derailed in the Down tunnel, the conductor rail was displaced and penetrated the floor of the front coach.

 

Modernisation

By 1938, this stock was becoming very antiquated and the SR took the decision to modify the line and provide completely new stock. Improvements to the line included welding the running rails into 315' lengths whilst new 100 lb. per yard conductor rails were provided, these now being in the conventional position outside the running rails and raised above them.

The line was also re-signalled with LT-style two-aspect colour light signals working in conjunction with automatic train stops. Manual operation of the signals was retained at Waterloo but operations at Bank were automatic, though a signalbox was provided there for use when required.

The new trains were ready from about April 1940, running trials on the main line system, some of these being between Wimbledon and East Putney, and the last of the old stock was removed from the line by November 1940, most being taken to either Eardley Sidings (near Streatham) or Gatwick for eventual scrapping (some surviving as late as 1948 before being dismantled) though most had the bodies separated from the underframes some time before being scrapped.

To effect the changeover from old to new trains, the line was closed completely between 25th – 27th October 1940. All the original stock was officially withdrawn from 13th November 1940 although all coaches were removed from the line 25th October 1940.

A number of the coaches stored at Eardley Sidings were damaged by enemy bombing on 17th April 1941 and the yard was hit again on both 2nd and 7th May 1944, before being broken-up.

 


Summary of original Waterloo & City stock.

 

Car No.

Car Type

Date New

SR Diag. No.

Notes

Builder
(assembler)

1 - 12

Motor Coach

1898

840

Single ended

Jackson & Sharp, Wilmington USA
(assembled at Eastleigh works)

13 - 17

Trailer Coach

1899 /1900

841

Double ended

Dick Kerr & Co. Ltd, Preston

21 ‑ 30

Trailer coaches

1898

845

 

Jackson & Sharp, Wilmington USA
(assembled at Eastleigh works)

31 & 32

Trailer coaches

1904

845

 

Electric Tramway Co. Ltd, Preston

33 ‑ 36

Trailer coaches

1922

845

 

Eastleigh Works, Hampshire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Disposal

Disposal of the original Waterloo & City stock (where known) was as follows.

All cars were initially sent to either Gatwick or Eardley (1,4,5,10,13,14,15,24,25,26,30,36).

 

Coach
No.

Builder

Assembled

Broken-up Complete

Body
Date

Place

Frame
Date

Place

1

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

Aug-42

Eardley

?

?

2

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

12-Feb-41

Brighton

15-Apr-42

Brighton

3

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

24-Jun-42

Gatwick

?

?

4

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

21- Aug -43

Eardley

25-Jul-45

Lancing

5

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

?

Eardley

?

Brighton

6

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

19-Feb-41

Brighton

15-Apr-42

Brighton

7

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

24-Jun-42

Gatwick

15-Sep-43

Lancing

8

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

?

?

?

?

9

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

24-Jun-42

Gatwick

15-Sep-43

Lancing

10

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

?

Eardley

?

Eardley

11

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

Jul-42

?

?

?

?

12

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

Jul-42

?

25-Jul-45

Lancing

13

Dick Kerr

Preston

-

?

Eardley

?

Eardley

14

Dick Kerr

Preston

-

'1948'

Eardley

?

Eardley

15

Dick Kerr

Preston

-

?

Eardley

?

Eardley

16

Dick Kerr

Preston

-

24-Jun-42

Gatwick

?

?

17

Dick Kerr

Preston

Aug-42

-

-

-

-

21

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

24-Jun-42

Gatwick

?

?

22

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

24-Jun-42

Gatwick

?

?

23

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

24-Jun-42

Gatwick

?

?

24

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

?

Eardley

?

Eardley

25

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

?

Eardley

?

Eardley

26

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

?

Eardley

?

Eardley

27

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

11-Jul-42

Gatwick

?

?

28

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

11-Jul-42

Gatwick

?

?

29

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

1-Jul-42

New X Gate

?

?

30

Jackson & Sharp

Eastleigh

-

?

Eardley

?

Eardley

31

Electric Tramway Co.

Preston

-

5-Aug-42

New X Gate

?

?

32

Electric Tramway Co.

Preston

-

?

?

?

?

33

LSWR

Eastleigh

26-Jun-42

?

Gatwick

?

Gatwick

34

LSWR

Eastleigh

-

?

?

?

?

35

LSWR

Eastleigh

-

26-Jun-42

Gatwick

?

?

36

LSWR

Eastleigh

-

‘1948’

Eardley

?

Eardley

 

 

Thanks go to author John Atkinson with assistance from C. Watts

 

 

 

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