BR British Rail Crimson & Cream Crimson and Cream Crimson Cream Blood & Custard Blood Custard Blood and Custard BR British Rail Crimson & Cream Crimson and Cream Crimson Cream Blood & Custard Blood Custard Blood and Custard BR British Rail Crimson & Cream Crimson and Cream Crimson Cream Blood & Custard Blood Custard Blood and Custard

 

© BloodandCustard

Southern

Ryde

& the Isle of Wight

 

28th August 1965
In the penultimate summer of steam services on the Isle of Wight, W28 leaves Ryde Pier Head with the 14.20 to Shanklin. Adams O2 no. W28 'Ashey' was built July 1890 as no. 186, shipped to the island in March 1926 and withdrawn December 1966.
© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

28th August 1965

In the penultimate summer of steam services on the Isle of Wight, W28 'Ashey' leaves Ryde Pier Head with the 14.20 to Shanklin. Adams O2 no. W28 was built July 1890 as no. 186, shipped to the island in March 1926 and withdrawn December 1966.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

History in Brief

The Cowes and Newport railway opened in 1862 before branching out towards Ryde. The Isle of Wight Railway opened the line from Ryde to Sandown in 1864, extending to Ventnor in 1866; Ryde station was at St Johns Road. Some distance from Ryde Pier and its tramway. Soon a street-running tramway was operating from Ryde Pier to St Johns Road.

However, in 1880 the railway was extended from St Johns Road to the Pier Head. With the 1923 ‘Grouping Act’ the Isle of Wight Railway was absorbed into the Southern Railway which in turn was became part of British Railways upon nationalisation in 1948.

The network on the island was reduced during the nineteen-fifties (from its maximum extent of 55½ miles) by the closure of the Merstone to Ventnor West line in 1952, followed by the Newport to Freshwater and Brading to Bembridge lines in 1953 and from Newport to Sandown in 1956.

A public enquiry into the closure of the remaining railway was held in October 1964, the outcome of which confirmed that only the line from Ryde to Shanklin (8½ miles) would remain open but emphasised that the route should be modernised.

The railway was closed between 1st January 1967 and 19th March 1967 for completion of the 630v DC third-rail electrification scheme ready for service on 20th March 1967 using the ‘new’ ex.London Transport stock. 4-car units were classified as 4 VEC and the 3-car units as 3 TIS, each 7-car train being a 7 VECTIS, the Roman name for the Isle of Wight.

 

Ryde Pier

 

A picture containing outdoor, green, old

Description automatically generated

28th August 1965

Adams O2 class no. W24 'Calbourne' is running light engine to the Pier Head. W28 was built December 1891 as no.209, sent to IoW April 1925 & withdrawn March 1967.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A train on the railway tracks

Description automatically generated

1st August 1964

Alongside the water tower, an unidentified
Adams O2 class departs from Ryde Pier Head.

© Ian Taylor (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A train on the railway tracks

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

July 1966

Adams O2 class with train depart Ryde Pier Head in the last summer of steam.

© Chris Morgan (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A train on the railway tracks

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

28th August 1965

On the left is set 492 forming the 13.40 from Ventnor behind Adams class O2 no. W17 'Seaview' (built as no.208 in November 1891, transferred to IoW as no.W17 in May 1930, withdrawn December 1966). On the right is one of the Pier Tramway’s diesel-powered tramcars returning to the Esplanade.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A train on the railway tracks

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

Summer 1967

Coupled to a 4 VEC unit, 3 TIS no.035 is seen at Ryde Pier Head platform one /two alongside a Drewry diesel-powered tram in summer 1967 (these trams having been converted from petrol in 1959). The tramway closed on 26th January 1969.

© Chris Wilson collection

 

 

A train on the railway tracks

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

July 1967

With car S9S leading, 3 TIS unit no.035 is on a seven car ‘VECTIS’ train from Ryde Pier Head to Shanklin in the first summer of the island’s electric train operation in July 1967. The funnel of paddle steamer ‘Ryde’ can be seen behind the train.

© Chris Wilson collection

 

 

Ryde Esplanade

 

A train travels down the tracks

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

August 1963

With the Portsmouth ferry waiting at the Pier Head a train departs Ryde Esplanade.

© John Lucas (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A train on the railway tracks

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

August 1963

A train arrives at Ryde Esplanade from Ryde Pier Head.

© John Lucas (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A train on the railway tracks

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

28th August 1965

Calling at Esplanade station on the 14.35 Ryde Pier Head to Cowes is no. W24 'Calbourne'. Appearing to have lost its 'W' prefix, no.W24 was built in December 1891, was brought across to the island in April 1925 and survived until March 1967 fortunately to be preserved on the heritage Isle of Wight Steam Railway.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A train on the railway tracks

Description automatically generated

5th August 1963

No.31 ‘Chale’ departing Ryde Esplanade.

© Colin Pyle (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

Ryde Esplanade Hoverport

By comparison to the railway, alongside Esplanade station the new Hovercraft service to Southsea was making steam traction look very antiquated. Hovertravel commenced services in 1965 using SNR6 hovercraft yielding a ten-minute crossing time to Southsea. Also used on the route to Cowes (1965-1980) the last of these SNR6 ‘Winchester Class’ hovercraft lasted until 1981.

 

A boat on the beach

Description automatically generated with low confidence

July 1966

SRN6 Hovercraft moving from sea to land.

© Chris Morgan (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A picture containing sky, outdoor, transport, people

Description automatically generated

28th August 1965

Passengers disembark from a SRN6 Hovercraft at Ryde.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

Ryde St. John’s Road

 

Train tracks next to a building

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

August 1963

O2 with train approach Ryde St John’s Road passes another in the sidings.

© John Lucas (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A train pulling into a station

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

August 1963

Train has the ‘road’ for Ryde Pier Head.

© John Lucas (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A train on the railway tracks

Description automatically generated with low confidence

10th April 1954

Adams O2 no.25 “Godshill” sits outside Ryde St John's Road Locomotive Shed ‘70H’ besides the station. One of two on the Isle of Wight (the other being at Newport) it had an allocation of eleven in 1954, all being O2 class, It closed December 1966 with the cessation of steam working. No. W25 was built November 1890 as no. 190, transferred to the Island as W25 in June 1925 and withdrawn in December 1962.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A picture containing sky, outdoor, farm machine

Description automatically generated

1st September 1958

Class O2 no.W24 ‘Calbourne’ and others

© Alan Passmore (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A picture containing outdoor, sky, house, old

Description automatically generated

15th July 1965

Minus one pair of driving wheels, no.W28 ‘Ashey’ outside the works. The last steam locomotive was overhauled here in 1966.

© Ian Taylor (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A train on the railway tracks

Description automatically generated

28th August 1965

A significant number of O2 class locomotives are visible from a passing train.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A train on the railway tracks

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

August 1963

W26 ‘Whitwell’ and the locomotive yard from inside the shed.

© John Lucas (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A black and white photo of a train in a station

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

August 1963

A view inside the shed with a line-up of class O2 locomotives. By this time, this was the only active locomotive depot on the island, that at Newport having been closed a few years earlier (although it was still being used for rolling stock storage).

© John Lucas (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A couple of people walk next to a train

Description automatically generated with low confidence

4th September 1966

Ministry inspection train gets the road at Ryde St Johns Road. The first electric car to be shipped was CT S38S on 1st September 1966, and this was used for a ministry inspection and clearance tests on 4th September 1966 to Shanklin, one pair of doors being made operable using compressed air from the steam locomotive braking supply.

© Brian Hardy

  

 

Brading

 

A train on the railway tracks

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

4th September 1966

Ministry inspection train undertaking gauging at Brading with ex.LSWR ‘O2’ steam locomotive no.24 ‘Calbourne’. Details of the barrier ‘box’ wagon are unknown.

© Brian Hardy

 

 

Sandown

 

A train on the railway tracks

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

17th September 1964

Children look on as the porter makes his way along the platform.

Note all the baggage trolleys.

© Norman Griffin (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

Shanklin

Shanklin station opened on 23rd August 1864 with the line
south to Wroxall and Ventnor
closing on 17th April 1966.

 

A train travels down the tracks

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

18th September August 1965

Trains passing at Shanklin station. In the foreground the train for Ryde waits for the tablet giving permission to occupy the section ahead when the signals would be cleared.

© Richard Green (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

Ventnor

Ventnor was the southern terminus of the Isle of Wight Railway, opening on 10th September1866, renamed Ventnor Town in 1953 before reverting to Ventnor in 1953 and closing on 17th April 1966. The site was quarried to create space for the station with the line immediately entering a tunnel under St Boniface Down. On a separate line south from Merstone, a second station serving the town (Ventnor Town) opened 1st June 1900, renamed Ventnor West in 1923 and closed 15th September 1953.

 

A train travels down the tracks

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

18th September 1965

A train leaves the tunnel into Ventnor station like a cork leaving a bottle!

© Richard Green (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A picture containing outdoor, sky, grass

Description automatically generated

August 1963

Ventnor was the terminus of the ex-Isle of Wight Railway from Ryde; south from Shanklin was closed on 18th April 1966.

© John Lucas (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A train on the railway tracks

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

16th April 1954

Towards buffer-stops at Ventnor station, which was built in a confined space above the town just outside the tunnel under St Boniface Down.

Running round its train before returning to Ryde Pier Head, no. W32 'Bonchurch' is an ex-LSW Adams class O2 built as No. 226 November 1892, renumbered & named on transfer to the Isle of Wight May 1928 and withdrawn October 1964.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A train on the railway tracks

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

15th July 1965

Class O2 no. W26 ‘Whitwell’ runs round its train at Ventnor.

© Ian Taylor (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A child standing next to a train

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

7th June 1965

W16 ‘Ventnor’ has the ‘road’ for Ryde.

Today, the young lad in the photograph will be approaching retirement!

© Howard Fuller (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A picture containing outdoor, tree, grass, field

Description automatically generated

August 1963

Locomotive running round at Ventnor station; by this time the O2 class were the only type running on the Island.

The 'caves' were the remains of chalk quarrying but, by the time of the photograph, some were occupied by coal merchants. Coal was imported into the Island through Medina Wharf, near Cowes, which was connected to the Cowes to Newport line by a short siding. Once the station was closed in 1966, movement of coal to Ventnor would have been by road.

Medina Wharf survives and is still used for importing bulk materials into the Island but is, of course, no longer rail connected. Ventnor signal box is visible on the right. It stood just by the portal of the St Boniface Down tunnel.

© John Lucas (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A train on the railway tracks

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

August 1963

Ventnor Station from St. Boniface Down.

Class O2 locomotive no.W14 'Fishbourne' is preparing to couple up to a Ryde train.

© John Lucas (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A train on the railway tracks

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

August 1963

O2 class locomotive no.W14 'Fishbourne' departs with a train to Ryde.

© John Lucas (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A black and white photo of a building with smoke coming out of it

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

August 1963

Entering Ventnor tunnel under St Boniface Down, a train for Ryde just leaving Ventnor Station. Ventnor signal box is seen, just at the entrance to the tunnel.

© John Lucas (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

Cowes

Opened on 16th June 1862, Cowes station was notable for its relatively unusual operating procedure using gravity-shunting. The engine would propel the empty coaches back up the 1 in 95 gradient towards Mill Hill, detach and then run forward and round the train using a crossover. The coaches were then allowed to run back down into the station by gravity (under handbrake control by handbrake by the guard) ready for the locomotive to be reattached ready for the next service to Newport and Ryde. The station closed on 21st February 1966.

 

Train from Ryde Pier Head at Cowes

28th August 1965

Headind by no.W24 ‘Calbourne’ the train has just arrived from Newport and beyond. The branch from Newport, closed for passengers on 21st February 1966 and goods on 16 May 1966. No.W24 was built in December 1891 as no.209, shipped to the Island in April 1925 but not was not withdrawn until March 1967. It is now preserved.

© Ben Brooksbank (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A train pulling into a station

Description automatically generated with low confidence

August 1963

A train from Ryde has just arrived, hauled by an unidentified class O2 locomotive. The gradient at Cowes allowed running round to be achieved by means of a gravity shunt.

© John Lucas (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

A train pulling into a station

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

August 1963

Although this appears to be a train approaching from Newport the ‘off’ shunt signal would appear to suggest it is propelling back in readiness for a gravity shunt.

© John Lucas (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

August 1963

Departing from Cowes.

© John Lucas (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

 

Of Interest….

RAF Calshot Flying Boat Station

 

A flying boat at RAF Calshot

1938

This is probably a Short Sunderland (introduced in 1937). As well as being a flying boat station, Calshot became a base for Air Sea Rescue boats during World War II. It was closed in 1961 although part of the site is now used by the RNLI and Coastguard.

© J.L. Lucas (CC-by-SA/2.0)

 

 

 

 

 

 

COPYRIGHT BLOODANDCUSTARD

PHOTOGRAPHIC COPYRIGHT AS INDICATED
(WITH GRATITUDE FOR USE)

 

 

Home

 

Contact